Investigating what controls marine N2O production

About the project or challenge area

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a major atmospheric greenhouse gas, with the ocean being one of the most important sources. Despite this importance, the ocean presents large uncertainties in estimate and controls in N2O production. This is because ocean N2O cycling depends on the complex interplay between the ecology, chemistry and physics of the ocean. This project aims at incorporating for the first time the cycling of N2O in a process-based ocean model to represent the dynamics between the ecology, chemistry and physics of the ocean and determine the controls of N2O production for the modern and future climate ocean.

Why choose this opportunity?

You will acquire specialist training in computer model programming, learning how to use and develop models of different complexity (from ecosystem to Earth system models). You will also develop expertise in marine ecology, ocean biogeochemistry and future climate change. You will have the opportunity to visit our collaborator Andy Rees at PML (Plymouth Marine Laboratory), who is expert on N2O ocean observations.

About you

We seek a highly motivated candidate interested in an interdisciplinary understanding of marine biology, ocean chemistry and climate.

How to apply

All students can apply using the button below, following the Cabot Masters by Research Admission Statement. Please note that this is an advertised project, which means you only have to complete Section A of the Research Statement.

Before applying, we recommend getting in touch with the project's supervisors. If you are interested in this project and would like to learn more about the research you will be undertaking, please use the contact details on this page.

Supervisor

Your supervisor for this project will be Dr Fanny Monteiro, Senior Lecturer in the School of Geographical Sciences. You can contact her at +44 117 928 9068 or email F.Monteiro@bristol.ac.uk.

Supervisor

Your co-supervisor for this project will be Dr Oliver Andrews, Lecturer in Biogeochemistry in the School of Geographical Sciences. You can contact him at +44 (0) 117 331 6789 or email oliver.andrews@bristol.ac.uk.

Find out more about your prospective research community

The Water theme is a vibrant community of researchers who are transforming the evidence base for water-based decision making in a changing and deeply uncertain world. Find out more about the Water research theme.

Find out more about your prospective research community

The Environmental Change theme is a vibrant community of researchers who integrate expertise across multiple disciplines to provide the evidence base and solutions to tackle the world's most pressing environmental challenges. Find out more about the Environmental Change research theme.

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