Energy storage with the use of phase change materials

About the project or challenge area

Phase change materials (PCM) are already used for basic energy storage, in reducing heat losses, increasing heat storage, controlling temperature changes, and controlling spaces' temperature. However, their high price makes them unaffordable for everyday applications. Some could be made by a combination of more affordable chemicals and used in developing countries , NGO’s applications and organisations. The aim of this project is to look at the chemistry of existing phase change materials and to develop new, cheaper materials for specific engineering applications.

Why choose this opportunity?

You will have the oportunity to be part of two faculties( Science and engineering) and learn and develop your skills in chemistry and engineering. You will have two supervisors to mentor you over the whole project.

About you

A basic chemistry knowledge is a must as half of the project is in chemistry.

How to apply

All students can apply using the button below, following the Cabot Masters by Research Admission Statement. Please note that this is an advertised project, which means you only have to complete Section A of the Research Statement.

Before applying, we recommend getting in touch with the project's supervisors. If you are interested in this project and would like to learn more about the research you will be undertaking, please use the contact details on this page.

Supervisor

Your supervisor for this project will be Dr Hind Saidani-Scott Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering. You can contact her by email H.Saidani@bristol.ac.uk.

Co-supervisor

Your co-supervisor for this project will be Neil Allan Professor of Physical Chemistry, School of Chemistry. You can email him neil.allan@bristol.ac.uk

Find out more about your prospective research community

The Low Carbon Energy theme is a vibrant community of researchers who innovate in every part of the energy system, from generation and storage, to regulation and end-user demand. Find out more about the Low Carbon Energy research theme.

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