News in 2012

  • Student’s pedicab business delivers festive spirit 4 January 2012 A booming student business has been busy delivering the Christmas spirit across Bristol thanks to its eye-catching rickshaws.
  • David Meakin, 1943-2011 4 January 2012 David Meakin, Senior Lecturer in French until his retirement in 2000, died in December 2011. Emeritus Professor John Parkin offers a tribute.
  • Christmas card recycling 5 January 2012 Recycle your Christmas cards at various locations around the University until 13 January.
  • Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures watched by 2.4million 5 January 2012 The recent Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures, delivered by renowned experimental psychologist Professor Bruce Hood from Bristol University, were enjoyed by 2.4million viewers over the festive period.
  • Professor Derek Offord named in New Year honours list 4 January 2012 Professor Derek Offord has been awarded an OBE in the Queen’s New Year honours list for services to Russian studies in language and culture.
  • €3.5m for research into volcanic unrest 5 January 2012 A collaborative research project that could significantly improve our understanding of the processes behind volcanic unrest and our ability to forecast its outcomes has been awarded almost €3.5 million by the European Commission.
  • Study calls for new approach to understanding children’s wellbeing 18 January 2012 Dr Debbie Watson, Senior Lecturer in Childhood Studies in the School for Policy Studies, is one of the authors of a new study that argues that wellbeing for children should be understood at the level of the individual child.
  • Dyson bursary to fund research into developing robotic tools 9 January 2012 Research into how robotic tools could help humans perform everyday tasks more efficiently is being carried out by a Bristol University student thanks to a bursary from the James Dyson Foundation worth £75,000.
  • NHS hospital mergers bring few benefits 11 January 2012 Mergers are unlikely to be the most effective way of dealing with poorly performing NHS hospitals, according to new research from the University of Bristol’s Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO).
  • Scientists map one of life’s molecular mysteries 26 January 2012 All living organisms are made up of cells, behind these intricate life forms lie complex cellular processes that allow our bodies to function. Researchers working on protein secretion — a fundamental process in biology — have revealed how protein channels in the membrane are activated by special signals contained in proteins destined for secretion. The results help explain the underlying mechanism responsible for the release of proteins such as hormones and antibodies into the blood stream.
  • Animals to benefit from new clinical facilities 10 January 2012 Animals in the region will benefit following the completion of new clinical facilities at the University of Bristol’s Langford Veterinary Services.
  • New research finds ideal number of embryos to implant during assisted conception 12 January 2012 Controversy exists over how many embryos should be implanted during assisted conception (in-vitro fertilisation/IVF) therapy. New research by the University of Bristol and published in the The Lancet shows that, while discretion can be applied in whether to implant one or two embryos, three or more should never be implanted into women of any age.
  • First step towards treatment for painful flat feet 12 January 2012 New research by the Universities of Bristol, East Anglia and Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, has made an advance in understanding the causes of adult-acquired flat feet – a painful condition particularly affecting middle-aged women.
  • Researchers discover particle which could ‘cool the planet’ 13 January 2012 Scientists have shown that a new molecule in the earth’s atmosphere has the potential to play a significant role in off-setting global warming by cooling the planet. In a breakthrough paper published in Science, researchers from the University of Manchester, the University of Bristol and Sandia National Laboratories report the potentially revolutionary effects of Criegee biradicals.
  • Bristol and Kyoto join forces to tackle the planet’s 21st century challenges 12 January 2012 Helping to prevent disasters around the world is one of the key research areas to be addressed by an international partnership between Bristol University and Kyoto University.
  • Computer models that predict crowd behaviour could be used to prevent the spread of infections at mass gatherings 16 January 2012 A new study led by Dr Anders Johansson in the University's Department of Civil Engineering, suggests computer models that predict crowd behaviour could be used to prevent the spread of infections at mass gatherings.
  • Media coverage: research finds ideal number of embryos to implant during assisted conception 12 January 2012 Controversy exists over how many embryos should be implanted during assisted conception (in-vitro fertilisation/IVF) therapy. New research by the University of Bristol and published in the The Lancet shows that, while discretion can be applied in whether to implant one or two embryos, three or more should never be implanted into women of any age. The findings have been covered by national and international media.
  • Top academic takes up new aerospace engineering role 13 January 2012 Professor Jonathan Cooper, formerly Professor of Aerostructures and Aeroelasticity at the University of Liverpool, has been named the new Airbus Sir George White Chair, a joint Bristol University / Airbus position. Sir George White founded one of the most important British aviation companies, the Bristol Aeroplane Company, back in 1910, one of the forerunners to BAE SYSTEMS and Airbus in the UK.
  • Why bats, rats and cats store different amounts of fat 20 January 2012 Why different animals carry different amounts of fat depends on how they have solved the problem of avoiding both starving to death and being killed by predators, new research from the University of Bristol suggests.
  • Media coverage for Science paper on particle which could 'cool the planet' 13 January 2012 Research into Criegee biradicals by Professor Dudley Shallcross in the School of Chemistry was covered by the Daily Mail, The National Post, PA, Reuters and a number of science websites.
  • Professor calls for more radical approach to public sector funding of UK film 16 January 2012 As the Government publishes its UK Film Policy Review today, Professor John Adams, who contributed to the Film Review Policy Panel consultations and has written extensively on UK film policy, calls for a much more radical, forward thinking approach to the use of public sector funding for UK film.
  • Research proves success of Sutton Trust summer schools 18 January 2012 New research from the University of Bristol published today [18 January] shows that non-privileged young people have a higher chance of going to a leading university if they attend one of the week-long university summer schools sponsored by the Sutton Trust.
  • Another chance to ‘meet your brain’ with Bristol psychologist Professor Bruce Hood 20 January 2012 The 2011 Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures, delivered by University of Bristol psychologist Professor Bruce Hood, proved so popular that they will be rebroadcast on BBC Two from Tuesday 24 January.
  • British Science Association seeks award lecture nominees 18 January 2012 The British Science Association is seeking nominations for its Award Lectures to be delivered during the British Science Festival in Aberdeen between 4 and 9 September 2012. The deadline for nominations is 27 January.
  • Climate balancing: sea-level rise versus surface temperature change rates 18 January 2012 Engineering our way out of global climate warming may not be as easy as simply reducing the incoming solar energy, according to a team of University of Bristol and Penn State climate scientists. Designing the approach to control both sea level rise and rates of surface air temperature changes requires a balancing act to accommodate the diverging needs of different locations.
  • Free media training for mid-career researchers 18 January 2012 The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is running a series of media training days for ESRC-funded, mid-career researchers (those beyond their first five years as a researcher). Non-ESRC-funded applicants may be permitted to attend if space allows.
  • Verandas and eggshell examination could improve hen welfare 18 January 2012 New research by academics at the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences to help farmers improve the health of free-range hens has found verandas for the birds and the early scrutiny of eggshells could improve their welfare.
  • Promoting legal capability in the UK 18 January 2012 A new framework, produced by the Personal Finance Research Centre (PFRC) at the University of Bristol and Law for Life, aims to improve public legal education so that more people are aware of their legal rights when faced with law-related issues in everyday life, such as consumer complaints, discrimination at work or debt problems.
  • Children as young as nine at risk of depression due to vitamin D deficiency 19 January 2012 New research from the Children of the 90s study at the University of Bristol shows that the link between low levels of vitamin D and depression is established in childhood and that ensuring children have a good intake of vitamin D could help reduce depression in adolescence and adulthood.
  • Shrew whiskers inspire ground-breaking robot design 20 January 2012 The Etruscan shrew, one of the world’s tiniest mammals, measuring around 4 centimetres long, is the inspiration for a ground-breaking new robot developed to use sophisticated whiskers to find its way around.
  • Survey of pet dogs indicates Lyme disease risk much greater than previous estimates suggest 25 January 2012 Ticks infected with the bacteria that cause Lyme disease may be considerably more prevalent in the UK than expected, according to new research from the University of Bristol that used pet dogs as ‘sentinels’ for human disease risk.
  • Sir David Attenborough’s latest insight into science is filmed at the University 20 January 2012 Legendary broadcaster Sir David Attenborough has made a starring appearance in one of Bristol University’s laboratories, which provided the backdrop for part of his upcoming series looking at the unparalleled change in our planet’s history he’s witnessed during his career.
  • Bristol scientists produce world’s first magnetic soap 23 January 2012 A University of Bristol team has dissolved iron in liquid surfactant to create a soap that can be controlled by magnets. The discovery could be used to create cleaning products that can be removed after application and used in the recovery of oil spills at sea
  • Magic mushrooms’ effects illuminated in brain imaging studies 23 January 2012 Brain scans of people under the influence of psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, have given scientists the most detailed picture to date of how psychedelic drugs work. The findings of two studies being published in scientific journals this week identify areas of the brain where activity is suppressed by psilocybin and suggest that it helps people to experience memories more vividly.
  • South West researchers awarded £4.2m to improve our understanding of life on Earth 24 January 2012 A new partnership, announced today by the Minister for Universities and Science, David Willetts, aims to establish the South West of England as a centre for international excellence in training for bioscience and food security research. The South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP), comprising the Universities of Bristol, Bath and Exeter, and Rothamsted Research, aims to equip future generations of scientists with skills they need to tackle the many challenges facing society today that have potential solutions in biological science.
  • Media coverage for world's first magnetic soap 24 January 2012 A University of Bristol team, led by Professor Julian Eastoe from the School of Chemistry, has dissolved iron in liquid surfactant to create a soap that can be controlled by magnets. The discovery could be used to create cleaning products that can be removed after application and used in the recovery of oil spills at sea. The research has received international coverage including New Scientist, The Hindu, Daily Mail and BBC World Service.
  • Students invited to have their say 24 January 2012 Students at the University of Bristol are being given the opportunity to have their say about how the Students’ Union is run and what issues they should be tackling.
  • Can gene therapy be used to prevent vein graft disease? 25 January 2012 Gavin Murphy, Reader in Cardiac Surgery in the School of Clinical Sciences at the University of Bristol, has been awarded a grant of over £100,000 from Heart Research UK to investigate gene therapy in vein grafts that are used in heart bypass surgery.
  • Marathon effort in honour of Registrar’s cancer battle 2 February 2012 The London Marathon will take on an extra-special meaning for one Bristol alumnus as he aims to complete the gruelling 26 mile course in honour of the University of Bristol’s recently retired Registrar Dr Tony Rich, who is battling the disease.
  • Web app could find out if a song has the X Factor 25 January 2012 A new web app that allows budding musicians to score their own songs to find out if they have hit potential has been launched by the University of Bristol’s Intelligent Systems Laboratory.
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