News in 2009

  • Bristol’s scientific talent win entrepreneurship prize 11 January 2010 A team of researchers from the University of Bristol has won an award in a national competition that rewards exceptional entrepreneurial skills.
  • New films explore the pain and the pleasure of maths 22 December 2009 A new film project that gives an insight into the extraordinary research carried out by Bristol mathematicians is being unveiled at the University of Bristol this week.
  • Preventing heart attacks by targeting the immune system 22 December 2009 More than 300 people die of a heart attack each day and research has shown there is a peak in heart attacks on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day due perhaps to rich meals, alcohol and stress. A new British Heart Foundation (BHF) grant of £715,000 has been awarded to Professor Andrew Newby at the Bristol Heart Institute, to find out if harmful sub-types of immune cells cause more heart attacks.
  • Art film completes university centenary 18 December 2009 Bristol University has rounded off its centenary celebrations by launching a unique video artwork that combines high technology with tradition and will help carry the university’s name around the world.
  • New insight into the defective protein that causes cystic fibrosis 18 December 2009 A team of researchers at the University of Bristol studying the protein that, when defective or absent, causes cystic fibrosis (CF) has made an important discovery about how that protein is normally controlled and under what circumstances it might go awry.
  • New grant for stem cell therapy in cardiovascular disease 16 December 2009 A new MRC grant of over £290,000 has been awarded to Paolo Madeddu, Professor of Experimental Cardiovascluar Medicine in the Bristol Heart Institute, to study stem cells in patients with cardiovascular disease.
  • Hope for the innocent? 16 December 2009 The role of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) — the independent public body set up to investigate possible miscarriages of justice — is questioned in a new book launched today [16 Dec] at a reception hosted by David Lammy, Minister of State for Higher Education, at the House of Commons in London.
  • 2.6 million adults experience social exclusion 16 December 2009 Research for the Cabinet Office by Dr Eldin Fahmy from the Centre for the Study of Poverty and Social Justice in the School for Policy Studies indicates that 16 per cent of working-age adults without children over the age of 25 – or 2.6 million people – experience multiple forms of social exclusion at any one point in time.
  • Visit Pompeii with the Victorians in Second Life 16 December 2009 A 3D recreation of a Roman house in Pompeii has been built in the virtual world Second Life by Dr Shelley Hales and Dr Nic Earle from the University of Bristol.
  • Bristol’s answer to Brussels 15 December 2009 The European Commission recently highlighted the need for good English-language translators and this year over 40 new postgraduates at the University are rising to the challenge by taking an online master’s degree in translation.
  • Saving the Greenland ice sheet 15 December 2009 Climate geoengineering may help maintain the Greenland ice sheet by reducing the amount of sunlight that reaches the Earth’s surface which in turn would cool the climate, despite rising CO2 levels.
  • Inspiring future engineers and scientists 14 December 2009 Eighty-five secondary school students will take part in hands-on activities, based on projects developed by industry, at the University of Bristol this week [14 to 16 December].
  • Vaccine study underway to combat meningitis 14 December 2009 Scientists at the University of Bristol have embarked on a ground-breaking study to help protect people from the killer disease meningitis. Volunteers will be given a vaccination and then the reaction of the immune system in the back of their throats will be analysed as part of a wider project to reduce cases of the disease.
  • Professor Browne’s election boosts Bristol’s statistics 14 December 2009 William Browne, Professor of Biostatistics in the Department of Farm Animal Science, has become the second Bristol academic to be elected to the current Council of the Royal Statistical Society.
  • Leverhulme grant for Widening Participation study 14 December 2009 A research group set up jointly by the University of Bristol and the University of the West of England (UWE) to study aspects of widening participation in education has been awarded a Research Project Grant by the Leverhulme Trust
  • Develop skills in creative writing and art for therapeutic purposes 14 December 2009 Bristol University’s Centre for Personal and Professional Development has launched its 2010 programme of short courses for people wanting to develop skills in creative writing, art and personal reflection.
  • Churchill’s only surviving child visits the University 14 December 2009 On Saturday [12 December], Lady Soames, Winston Churchill’s youngest and last surviving child, attended a commemorative event in Wills Hall at the University to mark the 80th anniversary of the official opening of the Hall by her father in December 1929, following his installation as Chancellor.
  • Born too early: a scientist’s view 14 December 2009 The UK has the highest rate of premature birth in Western Europe, one in 14 births are premature. A traumatic occurrence, the costs to both society and the NHS are high, however thanks to University of Bristol researchers, significant progress is being made into determining the often unknown factors associated with the development of pre-term birth.
  • Scientists hatch plans to send egg beneath Antarctic ice sheets 11 December 2009 £225,000 has been awarded to the University of Bristol to develop a new instrument to probe the depths of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, in order to monitor their behaviour in a warming climate.
  • Bristol innovators score twice in Engineer Awards 10 December 2009 The University made a strong showing in The Engineer Technology and Innovation Awards, with teams from Bristol involved in two of the eight award-winning projects.
  • Flying dinosaur controversy resolved 10 December 2009 New research appears to have ended a scientific debate that has vexed palaeontologists for almost 100 years.
  • Professor Johnston honoured for lifetime of achievement 9 December 2009 Professor Ron Johnston in the School of Geographical Sciences has been given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Association of American Geographers.
  • CMPO to research the economic impact of the 'third sector' 9 December 2009 A new research initiative on the economic impact of the 'third sector' (non-governmental voluntary and community groups, social enterprises, charities, cooperatives and mutuals), based in the Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO) at the University, will be launched today.
  • New Head for Bristol’s Vet School 8 December 2009 A veterinarian, who is a research expert on the functional adaptation and regeneration of bone in humans and animals, has been appointed as the new head of Bristol University’s Veterinary School and Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences.
  • Further discoveries at Bristol's Royal Fort 8 December 2009 More secrets of Bristol’s Royal Fort, one of the most significant fortifications from the English Civil War, have been uncovered by archaeologists from Bristol and Region Archaeological Services working on the site behind the University of Bristol’s H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory.
  • Bristol postdoc shares in high-performance computing prize 7 December 2009 Dr Rio Yokota, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Mathematics, was part of the team who won a prestigious prize at an international conference for high-performance computing, networking, storage and analysis.
  • Hot Planet 7 December 2009 A new documentary exploring the world’s leading climate scientists’ vision of our planet’s future airs this week on BBC One. Presented by Professor Kathy Sykes from the University of Bristol, the programme ‘Hot Planet’ takes a timely look at global warming during this month’s Copenhagen summit.
  • Cyber hacking could be a thing of the past 7 December 2009 Academics from Bristol University’s Department of Computer Science will present three papers on the theory and application of cryptology and information security at the ASIACRYPT conference in Tokyo this week.
  • New collection examines international development and post-imperialism 7 December 2009 A new study of international development and the legacies of imperialism, edited by members of the Department of Politics, is published on Wednesday [9 December].
  • Earth's temperature more sensitive to carbon dioxide than previously thought 6 December 2009 In the long term, the Earth’s temperature may be 30-50 per cent more sensitive to atmospheric carbon dioxide than has previously been estimated, reports a new study published in Nature Geoscience this week. The results show that components of the Earth’s climate system that vary over long timescales – such as land-ice and vegetation – have an important effect on this temperature sensitivity, but these factors are often neglected in current climate models.
  • Double first for Bristol in enterprise awards 4 December 2009 The University of Bristol is celebrating winning both awards in the first-ever South West University Enterprise awards.
  • The role of science and art in understanding the world 4 December 2009 Nobel prize winner, Sir Paul Nurse, will give a free public lecture at the University tonight [4 December] with Arts Director, Siân Ede, exploring how science and art can contribute to our understanding of the world around us.
  • Important Shostakovich archives come to Bristol 4 December 2009 A wealth of material relating to the life and work of the Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) has been acquired by the University of Bristol.
  • Revolution in teaching key subjects gains momentum 4 December 2009 National and international efforts to increase the supply of scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians are receiving a major boost from the University of Bristol.
  • Dr Bhalotra appointed to WHO Scientific Group 3 December 2009 Dr Sonia Bhalotra from the Department of Economics has been appointed to a new Scientific Resource Group on Health Equity Analysis and Research at the World Health Organisation.
  • ‘Bride-price’ in Uganda has negative impact on women 3 December 2009 A new report on the impact of ‘bride-price’ in Uganda highlights a range of negative effects that the practice has on women’s lives. A common practice in African countries, whereby material goods or money are paid by a groom to a bride’s family upon their marriage, the practice can result in abuse and impoverishment for a woman if she does not fulfil her ‘value’ to the marriage or attempts to leave.
  • Picasso, Chagall and Matisse at The Bristol Gallery 3 December 2009 A spectacular three-week-only Christmas exhibition celebrating the work of three great artists of the twentieth century, Picasso, Chagall and Matisse, opens at the Bristol Gallery on Saturday 5 December. The exhibition has been researched by three students from the Department of History of Art: Holly Lopez, Cicely Robinson and Natalie Taylor.
  • Bristol academic named dentist teacher of the year 2 December 2009 Susan Hooper, a consultant senior lecturer in the University of Bristol’s Dental School, has been named dentist teacher of the year by the Dental Defence Union (DDU), beating off stiff competition from the most talented and motivated teachers at the thirteen other dental schools in the UK.
  • University offers local pupils a sports day with a difference 2 December 2009 Around 60 pupils from the Bridge Learning Campus, Hartcliffe, will be taking part in a sports day at Bristol University’s Centre for Sport, Exercise and Health tomorrow [Thursday 3 December].
  • Why a short run is better than a long walk 2 December 2009 Using the latest technology, researchers from Bristol and Bath are uncovering evidence of exactly how major a role activity plays in the battle to keep obesity at bay. In new report published in the BMJ, scientists have shown that it’s the type of exercise you do, rather than the amount, that’s most important.
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