News in 2009

  • Welcome to a special year in our history 5 January 2009 Welcome to a special year in our history – a centenary message from the Vice-Chancellor.
  • University celebrates its first century 9 January 2009 The University is a hundred years old this year and today unveils the celebrations it has planned for 2009.
  • Spring at the Wickham Theatre 5 January 2009 The new season brings a mix of provocative theatre to the Wickham Theatre. Several of the companies are dealing with social issues, be it asylum seeking, the treatment of the elderly in society or young women from Easter Europe forced into the British sex trade.
  • Studies reveal lifelong gender difference in physical activity 6 January 2009 Two studies, presented today [Tuesday 6 January] at a major academic conference, reveal the gender difference in activity levels among school children and the over 70s.
  • Spookfish uses mirrors for eyes 7 January 2009 A remarkable new discovery shows the four-eyed spookfish to be the first vertebrate ever found to use mirrors, rather than lenses, to focus light in its eyes.
  • $1 million funding boost for Multiple Sclerosis research 9 January 2009 Funding worth around US$1 million has been secured for Apitope, a Bristol University spinout company that is looking at a potential life-altering therapy for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disorder that affects the central nervous system.
  • Aeschylus at the Wickham 9 January 2009 Final year undergraduates will provide a rare opportunity to see one of the foundation stones of Western theatre in its entirety when their production of The Oresteia comes to the Wickham Theatre from 22 - 24 January.
  • Bees attracted by floral iridescence 9 January 2009 New research shows for the first time that bees see some flowers in multi-colour because of previously unknown iridescence of the petals.
  • Cooling the planet with crops 15 January 2009 By carefully selecting which varieties of food crops to cultivate, much of Europe and North America could be cooled by up to 1°C during the summer growing season, say researchers from the University of Bristol.
  • University aims to raise £100m by 2014 14 January 2009 Last night [13 January], the University launched its Centenary Campaign to raise £100m by 2014. It aims to raise £15m for social responsibility, £7.5m for culture, £15m for medicine and health, £15m to support student talent, £19.5m for emerging science and technology and £28m for buildings and a general endowment.
  • Bristol University spinout, Apitope, announces licensing agreement 13 January 2009 Apitope, a Bristol University spinout company that is looking at a potential therapy for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), has announced today [13 January] a licensing agreement for up to €154 million in upfront, development and commercialisation milestone payments, in addition to royalties, to develop its peptide therapeutic for the treatment of MS.
  • Academics to appear on BBC’s Inside Out West 14 January 2009 Professors Tariq Modood and Mark Horton are two of the participants in this week’s edition of Inside Out West.
  • Bias in the rock record? 14 January 2009 Differences in the preservation potential of crustal rocks may explain peaks in crustal ages previously attributed to enhanced crust formation.
  • Athletes to reach new heights - opening of Sports Performance Centre 15 January 2009 Athletes in the South West will be able to reach new heights thanks to the opening of a new elite Sports Performance Centre. The Centre, that will stand alone as one of the most specialised strength and conditioning facilities in the region, is opening tomorrow Friday [16 January] at Bristol University’s Coombe Dingle Sports Complex.
  • Visit China for free 15 January 2009 Take a free tour of China at the Grant Bradley Gallery in Bedminster between 17 January and 21 February. The Picturing China 1870–1950 exhibition, organised by the University, showcases some 180 photographs of life in China before 1950.
  • Bubble economy under scrutiny 16 January 2009 The publication of a new book by Kevin Doogan, Jean Monnet Professor in the School for Policy Studies, has been described by leading British sociologist Ralph Fevre as ‘a seismic event’ that ‘annihilates conventional wisdom on labour markets’ .
  • Take a virtual tour of Special Collections 19 January 2009 As part of the centenary celebrations, the University Library is curating 100 Treasures, an online collection of 100 rare and fascinating gems, drawn from the University Library's Special Collections. The site is now live and open to virtual visitors.
  • Shadow Chancellor visits University for glimpse of a greener future 16 January 2009 The Faculty of Engineering hosted a visit from George Osborne, Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, today. Mr Osborne chose the Faculty as the venue to announce the launch of the Conservative Party's green paper on Green Technologies because of the University’s reputation in technologies for the environment.
  • Former Clinton adviser to launch centenary lecture series 19 January 2009 Groundbreaking approaches to tackling poverty and getting people off welfare and back into work are to be outlined by top welfare expert and former Clinton adviser Professor David Ellwood of the Harvard Kennedy School in a public lecture in the Wills Memorial Building at 6pm on Friday 23 January.
  • New clot-buster found 19 January 2009 Professor Alastair Poole and his BHF-funded team at the University of Bristol have found in mice that removal of a particular protein from platelets in the blood prevents dangerous clot formation but does not cause excessive bleeding.
  • Bristol’s future Olympians win gold 20 January 2009 Two Olympians of the future have won gold medals in the 2009 Australian Youth Olympic Festival (AYOF), a bi-annual event for Olympic aspirants between the ages of 13 and 19, held in Perth, Australia.
  • Quantum technologies move a step closer 22 January 2009 A team of physicists and engineers has demonstrated an optical device that filters two particles of light (or photons) based on the correlations between their polarisation.
  • Can cognitive behavioural therapy help defeat depression? 22 January 2009 The effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression will be examined by researchers at the University of Bristol as part of the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) programme.
  • Celebrate Chinese New Year this Sunday 22 January 2009 Monday 26 January marks the start of the Chinese Year of the Ox. To kick-start celebrations, the University and Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery are hosting a day of free, fun events for all the family from 11.00 to 16.00 on Sunday 25 January in the Wills Memorial Building and Bristol's City Museum and Art Gallery on Queen’s Road. All welcome.
  • Academics scoop over £2 million for medical research 22 January 2009 Medical research in Bristol has received a major boost thanks to funding worth over £2 million from one of Britain’s most important biomedical research organisations, the Medical Research Council (MRC).
  • Local heroes to be honoured 22 January 2009 As part of its centenary celebrations, the University has teamed up with the Bristol Evening Post to award up to four honorary degrees to largely unsung heroes from the Bristol area who have made a real difference to the quality of life in their local communities. Staff and students are invited to send their nomination to the Evening Post by Friday 27 February.
  • Best research thesis prizes 22 January 2009 Six University of Bristol postgraduates have been awarded prizes for the exceptional quality of their research degree theses.
  • Militarized Landscapes project on The One Show 23 January 2009 Bristol University’s ‘Militarized Landscapes in Twentieth-Century Britain, France and the United States’ project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council was featured on the BBC television programme The One Show on Monday 19 January.
  • Bristol top of the class for security 26 January 2009 The Universities of Bristol and Bath have both won a prestigious national security award.
  • University of Bristol submits plans for Biological Sciences and Mathematics Departments 26 January 2009 Planning and listed building applications have been submitted to Bristol City Council for proposals to create new research and teaching accommodation for the University of Bristol's departments of Biological Sciences and Mathematics.
  • University’s £100m Centenary Campaign to support local projects 28 January 2009 Last night [27 January] in Bristol, actress Stephanie Cole launched the University's Centenary Campaign to raise £100m by 2014 in six key areas, many of which are designed to provide support to the local community and which include a range of educational and sporting initiatives.
  • Crisis – or opportunity? 26 January 2009 Even in the toughest economic times, organisations and countries that grasp opportunities to refocus and adopt fresh approaches can win through. That's according to Jonathan Kestenbaum, a leading expert on innovation, who is to give a free public lecture, entitled 'Transforming the UK's capacity for innovation', at 6pm on Thursday 12 February in the Wills Memorial Building.
  • Comet impact theory disproved 26 January 2009 New data, published today, disproves the recent theory that a large comet exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, causing a shock wave that travelled at hundreds of kilometres per hour and triggering continent-wide wildfires.
  • Blue Peter gold badge for University Professor 27 January 2009 The BBC children’s programme, Blue Peter, has awarded Professor Anthony Hollander their prestigious gold medal for his involvement in one of the most revolutionary medical operations of recent times.
  • £1.9 million to improve quality of care for heart patients 4 February 2009 People suffering from angina or heart attacks are set to benefit from a major investigation by the University of Bristol into their quality of care. The research will be funded by £1,935,000 from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) and is a collaboration between Bristol University, University College London and Queen Mary University of London.
  • Dr Graham C Perry 1938-2007 29 October 2007 Dr Graham Perry died on 28 September 2007 at the age of 69. He is remembered by Professor Avril Waterman-Pearson.
  • Turning science into news 29 January 2009 The British Science Association is inviting applications for its 2009 Media Fellowship scheme, which provides scientists with an opportunity to gain first-hand experience of how science is reported.
  • Natural pest control on conventional and organic farms 3 February 2009 Research on farms in the South West has shown that a leaf-destroying insect is preyed upon by parasites to the same degree on conventional farms as on organic farms. The team, led by Professor Jane Memmott at the University of Bristol, studied natural pest control on conventional and organic farms and found no difference between the two systems.
  • Volunteers needed for research into treatment resistant depression 4 February 2009 Can hydrocortisone, a drug which affects the body’s stress system, help people with depression who do not respond to current treatments? Researchers at the University of Bristol are looking for volunteers to help answer this question by taking part in an important new study.
  • One of the brains behind the wireless revolution joins SWSIC 2 February 2009 The man credited with pioneering many of the major developments in mobile communications has been appointed a member of the South West Science and Industry Council (SWSIC).
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