Facilities

The facilities utilised for aerodynamics research can broadly be broken down into two categories; computational hardware for simulation and modelling work and experimental equipment for physical testing.

Computational facilities

kittyhawk low resMuch of the work carried out by the computational researchers within the group requires significant computational power, which is obtained from Multi-CPU clusters. Multi-CPU clusters allow `parallel' codes to be run, i.e. large problems split and run over several CPUs simultaneously, but also allow scalar codes to be run with multiple data sets simultaneously, i.e. a `scalar farm'. The group uses two main computational resources:

Experimental facilities

The group has access to a range of wind tunnel and other facilities operated by the Faculty of Engineering, these include:

  • Large Low Speed Wind Tunnel: 2.1 m x 1.5 m octagonal section; maximum speed 60 m/s; main uses: aerodynamics of aircraft, missiles, propellors, rotors and cars. Also, return section, 5.5 m x 2.6 m, maximum speed 12 m/s; main uses: rotor studies.
  • Low Turbulence Wind Tunnel: 0.8 m x 0.6 m octagonal section; maximum speed 100 m/s; turbulence level 0.05%; main uses: fundamental fluid mechanics and aerodynamics.
  • Open Jet Wind Tunnel: 1.1 m diameter; maximum speed 40m/s; main uses: aerofoil characteristics, vibration and oscillation studies.
  • Open Return Low Speed Tunnels (2): 0.6 m x 0.6 m working section; maximum speed approx. 35 m/s; main uses: teaching and student projects.
  • DANTEC 3D Laser Doppler Anemometer: Fibre-optic linked 5W argon-ion laser, 600 mm or 1600 mm focal length; high precision 3-axis traverse; processing by 3 Burst Spectrum Analysers.
  • Miscellaneous equipment typically associated with aerodynamic test facilities

Additionally the itself group holds a variety of equipment such as the EMEGG used for rocket nozzle testing.

 Open Jet Windtunnel  return section