• A passion for academic excellence 16 September 2008 The Vice-Chancellor, Professor Eric Thomas, considers the driving force behind the University’s ambition.
  • Personnel manager advises on research staff careers 15 September 2008 Christian Carter, Personnel Manager (Policy Development) in Personnel Services and Staff Development, has been appointed Deputy Chair of the Vitae Research Staff Advisory Group.
  • £1.06 million to improve access to physiotherapy 15 September 2008 Providing timely access to physiotherapy is a long-standing problem for the NHS, with more than 4 million new referrals each year and waiting times of several months in many areas. A Bristol-led study to improve access has been given £1.06 million by the Medical Research Council (MRC).
  • Dinosaurs' 'superiority' challenged by their crocodile cousins 11 September 2008 Good luck, not general ‘superiority’, was the primary factor in the rise of the dinosaurs according to new research from the University of Bristol. In a paper published in Science, Steve Brusatte and Professor Mike Benton challenge the general consensus that there must have been something special about dinosaurs that helped them rise to prominence.
  • Bristol’s Botanic Garden celebrates anniversary 11 September 2008 The University of Bristol Botanic Garden opens for its 30th anniversary year under the National Garden Scheme (NGS), which supports the opening of gardens of quality, character and interest, on Sunday 14 September from 2 pm to 5 pm.
  • Bleeding gums increase risk of heart disease 11 September 2008 Bad teeth, bleeding gums and poor dental hygiene can cause heart disease, Professor Howard Jenkinson from the University of Bristol will tell members of the Society for General Microbiology in Trinity College, Dublin today [Thursday 11 September].
  • University launches new green initiative 10 September 2008 The University has launched a unique initiative to enable staff to improve its environmental credentials.
  • Bristol professor to help Government tackle inequality 10 September 2008 Harriet Harman, Minister for Women and Equality, today [10 September] announced the setting up of the new National Equality Panel.
  • Beatles on the brain 10 September 2008 What springs to mind when you hear a Beatles song? How often are our memories of an important event linked to music? These are just some of the questions that will be answered by Graham Collingridge, Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Bristol, in a talk at this year’s BA Festival of Science.
  • Bristol scientists are part of the world’s biggest experiment 10 September 2008 Today, Wednesday 10 September 2008, the largest scientific experiment in the world will officially start, with University of Bristol scientists at the forefront.
  • New drug hope for cystic fibrosis patients 9 September 2008 A new drug therapy may represent a tremendous step forward in the treatment of some 70,000 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients worldwide, Dr David Sheppard from the University of Bristol told an audience at the BA Festival of Science in Liverpool today [9 September].
  • Bristol scientists reach out to help schools in Africa 8 September 2008 Scientists from Bristol University are taking part in a challenging new science engagement project, which aims to support chemistry outreach work in disadvantaged schools across South Africa’s Eastern Cape.
  • Global warming wiped out the first rainforests 8 September 2008 Spectacular discoveries of fossil forests show that global warming wiped out the first rainforests to evolve on our planet.
  • The UK's biggest serial killer 6 September 2008 Every two minutes someone in the UK has a heart attack and Liverpool has one of the highest rates of heart disease in the country. New research suggests drugs targeting a bad type of white blood cell, a macrophage, which causes plaque rupture, could prevent heart attacks without affecting the normal ability of white blood cells to fight infections.
  • Insight into the lives of older Bristolians 5 September 2008 The early results of a University of Bristol project examining the lives of older people in Bristol will be presented at the 37th conference of the British Society of Gerontology at the University of the West of England.
  • Early weight gain linked to higher blood pressure in adulthood 5 September 2008 The pace of weight gain in early childhood may be associated with increased blood pressure in adulthood, according to a report by researchers at Bristol University. The findings were published in October’s edition of Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.
  • Molecular evolution is echoed in bat ears 4 September 2008 Echolocation may have evolved more than once in bats, according to new research from the University of Bristol published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
  • Toshiba’s Telecommunications Research Laboratory celebrates its 10th anniversary 4 September 2008 The telecommunications revolution has transformed people's lives. With mobile phones, computers and the Internet, people are used to communicating almost anywhere, any time. Toshiba’s Telecommunications Research Laboratory (TRL) in Bristol celebrates its 10th anniversary this month.
  • Height linked to risk of prostate cancer 3 September 2008 A man’s height is a modest marker for risk of prostate cancer development, but is more strongly linked to progression of the cancer, say Bristol researchers who conducted their own study on the connection and also reviewed 58 published studies.
  • Addressing the issues of ageing 3 September 2008 The key challenges facing our ageing world will be addressed by international experts in Bristol this week. Sustainable communities, housing and health are some of the issues that will be under discussion at the 37th conference of the British Society of Gerontology, hosted by the University of the West of England and the University of Bristol.
  • Centre for Deaf Studies celebrates 30th year 3 September 2008 The University’s Centre for Deaf Studies – Europe’s first academic institution to concentrate solely on research and education that aims to benefit the Deaf community – is 30 years old next month.
  • New advice for treating fever in young children 3 September 2008 Ibuprofen reduces a child’s temperature faster and for longer than paracetamol, in the first four hours a child has a fever. If the fever persists, then children should be given ibuprofen plus paracetamol, according to a study published today online at BMJ.com.
  • Battle-scarred birds are more co-operative 3 September 2008 Just as football fans commiserate with their friends in the pub when their team loses a match, research from the University of Bristol demonstrates that birds support one another following contests with their rivals.
  • Medics and musicians 1 September 2008 Two Bristol medics – a member of staff and a student – were among the 13 Bristol University Officers’ Training Corps (UOTC) members at the Somerset Army Cadets annual camp last month, where manoeuvres were not the only thing on the menu.
  • Bristol commended for good practice in employing women 1 September 2008 Bristol University has received a further national award celebrating good practice in employing women in science, engineering and technology (SET) departments.
  • £4.1million extension for Social Medicine 1 September 2008 A £4.1million extension to Canynge Hall, the home of the University of Bristol’s world-class, 6*-rated Department of Social Medicine, on Whiteladies Road will be opened today.
  • Autumn at the Wickham Theatre 28 August 2008 The autumn season at the Wickham Theatre, situated in the Department of Drama, University of Bristol, brings a mix of provocative theatre to its intimate studio, featuring some of the best in touring theatre, student performances, lectures and talks.
  • What does your MP really believe? 28 August 2008 MPs tend to ‘toe the party line’ on parliamentary votes, but when it comes to expressing their private opinions, Dan Bailey and Guy Nason, statisticians from the University of Bristol, have looked at just how cohesive political parties really are.
  • Why is Greenland covered in ice? 27 August 2008 There have been many reports in the media about the effects of global warming on the Greenland ice-sheet, but there is still great uncertainty as to why there is an ice-sheet there at all.
  • Prestigious new grant for volcano research 27 August 2008 Professor Steve Sparks is to receive an ERC Advanced Grant for a study of volcanoes and their environmental and social impact.
  • Bristol receives accolades for innovative research 20 August 2008 The University of Bristol has received two international accolades for its innovative research. Bristol was selected from 200 universities worldwide to receive two 2008 HP Labs Innovation Research Awards, which fund research between academic institutions and HP Labs to generate breakthroughs in information technology.
  • Domestic violence study published 20 August 2008 A government-commissioned report on domestic violence, co-authored by Bristol academics, was published earlier this month.
  • Alexander Technique has significant long-term benefit for low back pain 20 August 2008 A major study – one of the first of its kind – has found significant evidence that the Alexander Technique can provide long-term benefit for people suffering from chronic or recurrent low back pain. The study by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Southampton is published in the BMJ.
  • Student is one of country's most promising entrepreneurs 19 August 2008 A mechanical engineering student at the University of Bristol has been selected as one of the country’s most promising young entrepreneurs. George Mills, aged 22, was one of only eleven students in the UK to have been awarded a place on the prestigious Flying Start Global Entrepreneurs programme, which includes mentoring from some of America’s leading entrepreneurs.
  • John Barrie Thornes 1940-2008 18 August 2008 John Thornes, former professor of physical geography and Dean of Graduate Studies in the Faculty of Science, died on 17 July at the age of 67. Emeritus Professor Peter Haggett remembers ‘one of the most eminent and influential physical geographers of his generation’.
  • Michael Morgan 1928-2008 18 August 2008 Dr Michael Morgan, former head of Geography, died on 23 July. He is remembered here by current and former colleagues.
  • New approach needed to help street-based sex workers 18 August 2008 Integrated multi-agency work will be needed to address the poor physical and mental health experienced by street-based sex workers (SSWs), according to recent research including a new study by Bristol University.
  • New insights into centre of the Earth 15 August 2008 A new observation of the very deepest part of the Earth, the solid inner core, has been reported this week in 'Nature'. The team from the University of Bristol also observed intriguing evidence of a ‘texture’ in the solid iron that may reflect the patterns left as the swirling liquid iron of the outer core freezes to form the inner core.
  • Undergraduate Admissions 14 August 2008 The University received over 37,000 applications for the 3,200 home-funded undergraduate places available across the full range of subjects from this October. The University’s continuing popularity is due to its international reputation for quality and its location in this vibrant city.
  • What three-year-olds eat affects their school performance many years later 12 August 2008 School dinners have come under the spotlight recently, but new research suggests that diet in the pre-school years is even more important.
Pages: << < 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14 > >>
Edit this page