Treasure's description

Solar eclipse

Solar eclipse

The solar eclipse of 1715 was the occasion for the publication by astronomers of informative engravings aimed at a wide public. Three survive in the voluminous archive of the Pinney family. That illustrated was written by William Whiston, a noted scholar (friend of and successor to Isaac Newton as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics), who had been expelled from Cambridge for his unorthodox religious beliefs, and made a living as a public lecturer, which he supplemented with the profits of his eclipse-related publications. A detailed discussion, ‘Ephemeral events: English broadsides of early eighteenth-century solar eclipses’ was published by Alice N. Walters in the journal ‘History of science’ in 1999.