• Global demand for Bristol-designed musical instrument 8 March 2013 It’s the size of a football and uses 48 touch pressure pads to trigger and manipulate sounds and rhythms. This revolutionary Bristol-designed electronic musical instrument – called the AlphaSphere ‘elite’ – has proven so popular that it’s received orders from around the world.
  • Bristol academic scoops top TV award 7 March 2013 A Bristol chemical physicist was one of the creative brains who led a unique fusion of art and quantum mechanics honoured at the Royal Television Society Awards, West of England.
  • Impact of magma input rate on magma chamber growth – granite intrusion or volcanic eruption? 7 March 2013 A computational approach which links processes deep below a volcano to potential eruptions is described by researchers at the University of Bristol in a paper published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research. The research could ultimately help scientists to understand magma chamber processes and volcanic eruption timing.
  • New Bristol film festival shines light on future stars 7 March 2013 An exciting new film festival has been launched in Bristol, offering budding filmmakers the chance to have their work screened at the Watershed and judged by industry professionals. Entries can now be submitted for the Jump Cut Short Film Festival, which will take place on 12 May, and is open to anyone aged 18 to 30.
  • Future Brunels learn about the ‘magic’ of science 6 March 2013 A group of talented Bristol pupils will delve into the worlds of science and magic as part of a special programme run by ss Great Britain to inspire the next generation of Brunels. The group of Year 9 students, who are now in the third year of a five-year scheme, will visit the University of Bristol on Wednesday, 6 March, to learn about aspects of engineering and psychology.
  • Findings published on the impact of a cap on the total cost of credit 6 March 2013 The Department for Business Innovation and Skills have today published an independent research report from the University of Bristol on the impact of a cap on the total cost of credit. The publication coincides with the publication of the Office of Fair Trading’s final report on payday sector compliance. Both reports clearly show there is significant evidence of consumer detriment in the high-cost credit markets.
  • Could a common blood pressure drug slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s? 5 March 2013 A groundbreaking trial that hopes to discover if a drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure could slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) will begin shortly thanks to funding of nearly £2 million by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and managed by the National Institute for Health Research.
  • Children of the 90s welcomes its 2,000th dad 4 March 2013 ALSPAC, the Children of the 90s study, has welcomed the 2,000th father through its doors
  • Love and Anarchy: Bringing chanson to the UK 4 March 2013 A new recording of English language versions of songs by Léo Ferré, made by a researcher at the University of Bristol, aims to brings the work of this famous chanson artist to a wider audience in the UK.
  • Celebrating Latin America in Bristol 4 March 2013 A three-month celebration of Latin American culture in Bristol, organised by the University of Bristol, begins next Thursday [7 March] with a week of artistic events open to the public.
  • Royal Statistical Society honour for Sir John Kingman 1 March 2013 Sir John Kingman, former Vice-Chancellor of the University and now Emeritus Professor in the School of Mathematics, has been awarded the Guy Medal in Gold from the Royal Statistical Society (RSS) - its top honour.
  • Scientists awarded grant to determine UK's greenhouse gas emissions 1 March 2013 Researchers in the University of Bristol’s Atmospheric Chemistry Research Group (ACRG), in collaboration with scientists around the country, have been awarded funding from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to provide an independent 'top-down' check on the UK's greenhouse gas emissions estimates.
  • Student captures stunning collection of North American wildlife 1 March 2013 A second-year student at the University of Bristol and aspiring professional wildlife photographer, film-maker and presenter, has captured a stunning collection of images as part of a unique project which aims to document the charismatic mega-fauna found in the pacific west coast ecosystems of Vancouver Island.
  • Pupils in Tanzania receive boost to learning thanks to anonymous donor 1 March 2013 An anonymous donor has awarded the University of Bristol £242,000 for a new project to help improve learning for pupils in disadvantaged rural secondary schools in Tanzania, Africa.
  • Hypermobility a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain in teenagers 28 February 2013 Young people with joint hypermobility, also known as double-jointedness, are at increased risk of developing musculoskeletal pain in their teenage years, according to new research led by academics at the University of Bristol.
  • Bee a guardian and have your gardening questions answered too 27 February 2013 A talk, organised by the Friends of the University of Bristol Botanic Garden, later this week [Saturday 2 March] will explain how the general public can help the bees and people can have their gardening questions answered too.
  • Shape changing technology coming soon 27 February 2013 A new project aims to ensure that the next generation of computer and mobile display surfaces will allow users to physically push, pull, bend, fold or flex the display thanks to funding of €2.47 million by the European Union.
  • Bristol's first ever student law conference [Fri 8 March] 27 February 2013 Following the highly publicised Leveson Inquiry, some of the country’s leading minds in the field of law and the media will be discussing the often contentious relationship between the two at the first ever Bristol Law conference on Friday 8 March 2013.
  • Wasp transcriptome creates a buzz 27 February 2013 New research delivers a sting in the tail for queen wasps. Scientists at the University of Bristol have sequenced the active parts of the genome – or transcriptome – of primitively eusocial wasps to identify which part makes a queen or a worker.
  • Ship noise makes crabs get crabby 27 February 2013 A study published today in Biology Letters found that ship noise affects crab metabolism, with largest crabs faring worst, and found little evidence that crabs acclimatise to noise over time.
  • Palaeontologist reveals insects’ colourful past 26 February 2013 An international research team led by a University of Bristol scientist has explained the preservation of colours in fossil insects for the first time. The discovery explains why colours change and why they are destroyed during fossilisation, revealing hidden gems in the insect fossil record that could help reconstruct the evolution of colours in insects.
  • Professor Malcolm Evans re-elected chair of largest human rights treaty body in UN 26 February 2013 Malcolm Evans, OBE, Professor of Public International Law at the University, has been re-elected to chair the United Nations (UN) Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture (SPT). The SPT derives its mandate from the Optional Protocol to the UN Convention against Torture. It is a multidisciplinary body of independent experts with 25 members and is the largest of the UN human rights treaty bodies.
  • Cell scaffolding protein fascin-1 hijacked by cancer 26 February 2013 A protein involved in the internal cell scaffold is associated with increased risk of metastasis and mortality in a range of common cancers finds a study by University of Bristol researchers published in Biomed Central’s open access journal BMC Medicine.
  • Famous comedian to star in charity gig for inspirational Will 25 February 2013 The plight of student Will Pope, who is recovering after a long-awaited heart transplant, has inspired fellow students at the University of Bristol to organise a fundraising concert in his honour – with comedian Rory McGrath making an appearance to pledge his support.
  • Iain Elliott, 1942-2013 25 February 2013 Iain Elliott, a member of University staff for almost 50 years, died in January. His friend and colleague, Tony Macdonald, offers a tribute.
  • Most babies slow to grow catch up by early teens 25 February 2013 New parents are pleased when their baby gains weight as expected, but if the rate of weight gain is slow parents can become worried and concerned about their child’s future size.
  • Quantum algorithm breakthrough 24 February 2013 An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bristol and the University of Queensland, Australia, has demonstrated a quantum algorithm that performs a true calculation for the first time. Quantum algorithms could one day enable the design of new materials, pharmaceuticals or clean energy devices.
  • Exploring the roots of volcanic eruptions: insights from deep magmatic processes 22 February 2013 An exploration of deep magmatic processes occurring in the Earth's crust beneath volcanoes, which could contribute to linking these physical processes at depth with volcanic eruptions at the surface, has been carried out by researchers from the University of Bristol and the Swiss Federal Institute in Zurich. The experimental study is published in Chemical Geology.
  • Widespread coverage for research on floral electrical fields 22 February 2013 Research by Professor Daniel Robert, Dr Heather Whitney and Dominic Clarke in the School of Biological Sciences which found that bees and flowers communicate using electrical fields received widespread media coverage in the UK and across the world.
  • New research improves estimates of amount of ash in volcanic clouds 22 February 2013 The amount of ash released by Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano during April 2010 was significantly underestimated at the time of the eruption, according to a new model developed at the University of Bristol and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research. This could have important consequences for airspace management during future eruptions.
  • Floral signs go electric 21 February 2013 Flowers' methods of communicating are at least as sophisticated as any devised by an advertising agency, according to a new study, published today in Science Express by researchers from the University of Bristol. The research shows for the first time that pollinators such as bumblebees are able to find and distinguish electric signals given out by flowers.
  • Students’ Union picks up award from Houses of Parliament 21 February 2013 The University of Bristol Students’ Union (UBU) has collected an award which celebrates its success over recent years from the Houses of Parliament. UBU received a bronze award from the Student Union Evaluation Initiative (SUEI) in recognition of ‘transformational change’ within the organisation between 2010 and 2012.
  • New project will transform city’s talent into resource for young people in Bristol 21 February 2013 An ambitious new project compiled by the people and institutions of Bristol to help young people thrive and flourish in the context of changing environmental, technological and economic times will launch its online call for ideas this week [Thursday 21 February 2013].
  • Businesses of the future vie for share of £35,000 prize fund 20 February 2013 Creating pop-up farms around Bristol and establishing a student-run lettings agency are just two of the innovative entries which have been shortlisted to win a share of £35,000 in a competition run by the University of Bristol.
  • The effective collective 20 February 2013 For social animals such as schooling fish, the loss of their numbers to human activity could eventually threaten entire populations, according to new research which found that such animals rely heavily on grouping to effectively navigate their environment.
  • New projections of 'uneven' global sea-level rise 20 February 2013 Sophisticated computer modelling has shown how sea-level rise over the coming century could affect some regions far more than others. The model shows that parts of the Pacific will see the highest rates of rise while some polar regions will actually experience falls in relative sea levels due to the ways sea, land and ice interact globally.
  • The future of space exploration comes to Bristol 20 February 2013 A prototype Mars rover called Bridget will be exploring the terrain of Bristol this weekend as she makes a starring appearance at one of the largest space conferences held in the UK. Bridget is due to play a pivotal part in an expedition to explore the red planet in 2018, but her next mission is to take part in the National Student Space Conference 2013, taking place at the University of Bristol on Saturday and Sunday [23 and 24 February].
  • Efficient distributed quantum computing 20 February 2013 A quantum computer doesn't need to be a single large device but could be built from a network of small parts, new research from the University of Bristol has demonstrated. As a result, building such a computer would be easier to achieve.
  • Acacia trees crucial to Israel's desert bats, study finds 19 February 2013 Greater conservation of threatened acacia trees is needed to preserve vulnerable species of rare insectivorous bats in Israel, according to new research by biologists at the University of Bristol. Dense areas of flourishing acacia trees are in decline due to increasing water stress and the encroachment of human activity into their ecosystem, but such trees represent the only habitat that supports some rare and endangered species of bat.
  • University and industry engage in the future 19 February 2013 A Faculty of Engineering research and industry event next week [Monday 25 February] aims to strengthen and expand the Faculty’s links with engineering and technology companies to address some of the challenges of the next century.
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