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The University will make every effort to provide disabled access, where possible, to all of its events. If you have any support requirements due to a disability, please contact the event organiser directly at the earliest opportunity.



March 2015

Tuesday 3 March 2015
Inaugural lecture: The art of thinking
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor Richard Pettigrew, Department of Philosophy.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:00pm  
Psychologists have documented the cognitive biases that make us irrational. Philosophers have tried to codify the rules of rational thought. But how can we use reason to explore its own shortcomings? After exploring one answer, Professor Pettigrew discuss the disastrous effects of these biases on the diversity of participation in academia. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 3 March 2015
The Idea of the University: the University in Crisis?
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Dr Ian Wei, Department of History.
Goldney Hall, 7:30pm  
University websites tell us that universities are wonderful in every way. Governments declare that their higher education policies have been hugely successful. The achievements of students are indeed remarkable. But much recent academic work argues that universities today are in crisis. So, is there a crisis and should we be worried?. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended on the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 3 March 2015
Talk by Nick Francis, Research Prevention Committees: Unlocking the door to conducting research during pandemics
Organised by School of Social and Community Medicine
Dr Nick Francis, Cardiff University.
Oakfield House, Room OS6, 12:45-1:45pm  
This talk will focus on how the current political, ethical, and regulatory environment surrounding health research seeks to protect potential participants, but stifles efficiency, and therefore comes at a considerable cost for society. Full synopsis available on the website.. Further information is available
The seminar is free and all are welcome to come.  Contact Laura Fox on +44 (0)117 - 331 0124 or laura.fox@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 4 March 2015
Churchill 2015: Churchill: For and against
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Dr Paul Addison, Honorary Fellow of the University of Edinburgh.
Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:30pm  
Winston Churchill was a highly controversial figure in his lifetime and even today, half a century after his death, his critics and admirers remain sharply divided over his merits. Dr Paul Addison will discuss the reasons why Churchill continues to generate debate and offers a personal assessment of his achievements and failures. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the online form.  Contact for other queries, Emma Henry email: public-events@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 5 March 2015
Sexual Violence in the Academy: A panel discussion hosted by Professor Marianne Hester OBE
Introduced by Professor Wendy Larner, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Law.
Priory Road Lecture Theatre, Priory Road Complex, 6:15pm  
This free event marks International Women's Day. Professor Marianne Hester OBE will be hosting a panel discussion and Q&A with Alice Philllips (University of Bristol Students' Union), Lisa Benjamin (Somerset & Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support), Duncan McPhee (Senior Lecturer in Criminology, UWE), and Professor Phil Rumney (Professor of Criminal Justice, UWE). Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the online form.The event will be followed by a wine reception.  Contact for other queries (or access requirements), email: vikki.layton@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 5 March 2015
Coleridge Lectures 2015: The only true conservationist is a Conservative
Organised by The Cabot Institute, in association with the Festival of Ideas
Roger Scruton is a writer and philosopher. He has specialised in aesthetics with particular attention to music and architecture.
Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:30pm  
Roger Scruton argues that the only true conservationist and environmentalist is a Conservative. Conservatism is far better suited to tackle environmental problems than either liberalism or socialism; rather than entrusting the environment to unwieldy NGOs and international committees, we must all assume personal responsibility and foster local sovereignty. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the Festival of Ideas website.  Contact for other queries, email: ideas@gwebusinesswest.co.uk

Thursday 5 March 2015
What makes a good film? Teaching film criticism and evaluation
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Dr Pete Falconer, Department of Film & Television.
Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, 1:00pm  
In this lecture, Pete Falconer will reflect on my experiences of teaching film criticism and evaluation to university students at Bristol and elsewhere. How do we appreciate film, and how do we teach it? See the website for more details. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended on the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 5 March 2015
Humanity in song: Schubert's Winter Journey
Organised by the Bristol Institute for Research in the Humanities and Arts
Ian Bostridge.
Peel Theatre, Geographical Sciences, University Road, BS8 1SS, 6:00pm  
Free, but booking required via the online form.  Contact Samantha Barlow on +44 (0)117 - 331 7879 or sam.barlow@bristol.ac.uk

Saturday 7 March 2015
Festival of Physics
Organised by School of Physics, and the SW Branch of the Institute of Physics
HH Wills Physics Laboratory & the Life Sciences Building, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TL, 9:45am-4:30pm  
The Festival of Physics will include lectures, workshops, demonstrations and an inflatable planetarium! Exhibits include: Explorer Dome, Liquid Nitrogen Show (Badminton School students), Physics Busking (Physics undergraduates), Demonstrations of First-year Undergraduate Physics Experiments and Prof J Butterworth ? book signing - "Smashing Physics", is the story of the discovery of the Higgs boson. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact Dr Vincent Smith email: vincent.smith@bristol.ac.uk

Saturday 7 March 2015
Jacobean City Comedies, Sense of Space & Place
Organised by English Department Literature and Creative Writing Short and Day Courses
Emily Derbyshire.
English Department, 3/5 Woodland Road, BS8 1TB, 10:30am-4:00pm  
Thomas Middleton, Thomas Dekker and Ben Jonson offer modern audiences a perspective into 17th Century London. Reflect upon Dekker's The Shoemaker's Holiday and gain an insight into the capital city as it was four hundred years ago. Scripts provided and an opportunity to participate in/watch performance extracts of the play. To book your place and for further information
£30.00.  Contact Valentine Jackson on +44 (0)117 - 928 8924 or english-lifelong@bristol.ac.uk

Sunday 8 March 2015
Special Winter Sunday opening of the University of Bristol Botanic Garden
Organised by The Botanic Garden
Nicholas Wray, Curator, Botanic Garden.
University of Bristol Botanic Garden, The Holmes, Stoke Park Road, Bristol BS9 1JG, 10:30am  
Join an inspiring two hour special tour of the Garden with the Curator, Nicholas Wray. The early spring delights will include the highly fragrant Chimonanthus praecox (Wintersweet), the bright golden-yellow flowers of Hamamelis mollis (Witch hazel) and the deliciously fragrant Daphne bholua 'Jacqueline Postill.'. Further information is available
Free to Friends. Visitors £4.50. Please meet at Welcome Lodge.  Contact for other queries, the Botanic Garden on +44 (0)117 - 331 4906 or botanic-gardens@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 10 March 2015
Complexity Colloquium: Decision-making in animal groups
Organised by Bristol Centre for Complexity Sciences (BCCS)
Dr Gonzalo de Polavieja - Cajal Institute (CSIC, Spain).
Lecture Theatre 1.18, Queen's Building, 12:00-1:00pm  
Guest speaker Gonzalo de Polavieja will be providing a talk about his research on decision-making and learning in animal groups and insights for human interactions. This talk will also showcase the use of the idTracker technology which allows video analysis of groups whilst tracking individuals without propagation of mistakes (increasing the amount of useable data). Further information is available
Free event, please use our online form to register.  Contact Matthew Guppy on +44 (0)117 95 45663 or matthew.guppy@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 10 March 2015
Talk by Alan Emond & Jean Golding
Organised by School of Social and Community Medicine
Alan Emond and Jean Golding, University of Bristol.
Canynge Hall, Room LG08, 39 Whatley Road, Bristol BS8 2PS, 12:45-1:45pm  
ALSPAC was designed as part of a collaborative series of European birth cohorts, the European Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ELSPAC), to collect similar information in different countries. ELSPAC Isle of Man is an epidemiological birth cohort enrolling over 1000 pregnant mothers. This presentation will outline the differences between the cohorts and opportunities for research. Further information is available
The seminar is free and all are welcome to come.  Contact Laura Fox on +44 (0)117 - 331 0124 or laura.fox@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 10 March 2015
Damaged Landscapes of the Anthropocene: the cost of living in the modern world
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Dr Merle Patchett, School of Geographical Sciences.
Churchill Hall, 7:30pm  
We live on a human-damaged planet. So much so that scientists worldwide are increasingly recognising this period of human disturbance of the Earth's ecosystems as a new geologic epoch named the Anthropocene. This lecture explores this provocation by visiting some of world's most human-disturbed landscapes and asks, can we continue like this?. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended on the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 10 March 2015
Inaugural lecture: Modelling disparate worlds: a journey into applications of Random Matrix Theory
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor Francesco Mezzadri, School of Mathematics.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:00pm  
What is the connection between the electrical current in a microscopic cavity and the arrival times of buses in a Mexican city? Random matrices model phenomena that have little or nothing in common. Professor Francesco Mezzadri will give an overview of some applications and highlight recent advances in the field. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 11 March 2015
Jean Monnet Lecture: Germany and the Eurozone crisis: the Emergence of the EU's New Hegemon?
Organised by School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies
Professor Simon Bulmer, University of Sheffield.
2D3, Social Sciences Complex, Priory Road, BS8 1TN, 5:00-6:00pm  
Has Germany assumed the role of the EU's hegemon? Evidence from the Eurozone crisis points in this direction. Yet there are clear limits to Germany playing this role. Simon Bulmer will consider these issues and the wider implications for the EU's future. Organised by Prof Michelle Cini, Jean Monnet Chair
All welcome. Reception afterwards. No booking required.  Contact Susan Battin on +44 (0)117 - 3317588 or sue.battin@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 11 March 2015
Inaugural lecture: Past, future, and fantasy climate change - from the mid-Cretaceous to Middle Earth
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor Dan Lunt, School of Geographical Sciences.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:00pm  
As a curiosity-driven scientist, understanding the past climate of our Earth (from the scorching greenhouse of the mid-Cretaceous, to the frozen wastes of the last ice age) is of fundamental interest. However, how can such understanding improve our predictions of future climate change? And what can we learn about climate from Lord of the Rings?!. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 11 March 2015
Ethics Seminar 2015: From theory to practice? The ethics of inclusive research
Organised by Graduate School of Education
Professor Melanie Nind (University of Southampton Education School, Co-director, ESRC National Centre for Research Methods) and Professor Mary Brydon-Miller (University of Cincinnati, directs the University of Cincinnati's Action Research Centre).
G4/5, 10 Woodland Road, 9:30am-5:00pm  
This seminar looks at the range of research from the highly theoretical to practice-based research and examines what influences decisions to decide on one approach above another. It takes as its focus, the ethics of inclusive research - from participatory research ethics to the ethics of inclusion. Further information and register here by 4th March
Please register to attend this free event, open to all.  Contact Wan Ching Yee on +44 (0)117 - 331 4305 or wan.yee@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 12 March 2015
'100% Dakar - more than art' film screening and round-table with Felwine Sarr
Organised by Department of French
The round-table discussion will include: Felwine Sarr (writer, academic and co-founder of publishing house, Editions Jimsaan), Annie Menter (a founder of the WOMAD festival and director of Afrika Eye film festival), Jacqueline Maingard (Department of Film and Television) and chaired by Ruth Bush (Department of French).
School of Modern Languages, LT3, 17 Woodland Road., 5:00-7:00pm  
100% DAKAR - more than art is a documentary about the arts scene in Dakar, Senegal. "100% Dakar" visits fashion designers, Hip Hop musicians, graffiti artists, a photographer, an art blogger, dancers and other artists and cultural entrepreneurs who stand for creativity, passion, social conscience and a collective, creative fight against economic and political burdens.
Free entry and all welcome.  Contact Ruth Bush email: ruth.bush@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 12 March 2015
The best selling show: Is there life on Mars?
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Dr Lucy Berthoud, Department of Aerospace Engineering.
Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, 1:00pm  
Dr Lucy Berthoud, who has worked at NASA and the European Space Agency, now teaches spacecraft design and will talk about her involvement with current and future Mars missions. She will explain, and demonstrate practically, the difficulties of getting to Mars and of bringing a Mars sample back to the Earth. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended on the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 12 March 2015
Coleridge Lectures 2015: Coleridge, The Ancient Mariner, Bristol and beyond
Organised by The Cabot Institute, in association with the Festival of Ideas
Richard Holmes is a Fellow of the British Academy, an Honorary Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:30pm  
The publication of the Lyrical Ballads in Bristol in 1798 launched the Romantic poetry movement. Richard Holmes looks at the life and work of Coleridge at this critical moment, and explores the varied interpretations of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and its powerful emergence as a modern eco-fable. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the Festival of Ideas website.  Contact for other queries, email: ideas@gwebusinesswest.co.uk

Saturday 14 March 2015
University Choral Society and Symphony Orchestra
Organised by Department of Music
Eve Daniell: soprano; Harim Oh: soprano; Niall Hoskin: baritone/narrator. Conductor: John Pickard.
Victoria Rooms, 7:30-9:30pm  
Butterworth: Rhapsody: 'A Shropshire Lad'; Elgar: A Voice in the Desert; Elgar: The Spirit of England; Vaughan Williams: Dona Nobis Pacem. Further information is available
Tickets: Balcony £15 (concessions £10); Stalls £10 (concessions £7).  Contact Megan Holmes and Margaret Peirson on +44 (0)117 - 33 14044 or music-resources@bristol.ac.uk

Monday 16 March 2015

This lecture has been cancelled, but will be rescheduled for a later date.

Inaugural lecture: The end of the Asylum. How Italy closed down its psychiatric hospitals.

Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor John Foot, Department of Italian.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:00pm  
This lecture will tell the story of a movement which emerged in the 1960s and 1970s in Italy in opposition to psychiatric hospitals. Its aim was to replace the asylum system with different forms of care. In 1978, this principle was enshrined in an historic law. The movement had won. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 17 March 2015
Inaugural lecture: A passing glance of wonder and pity: reflections on the history of medieval Ireland
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor Brendan Smith, Department of History (Historical Studies.
Pugsley Lecture Theatre, Queens School of Engineering, University of Bristol, BS8 1TR, 6:00-7:00pm  
Ireland was England's first colony. The spread of English power and English people throughout the neighbouring island after 1170 inspired a burst of literary activity as contemporaries sought to justify or discredit this colonial venture. This lecture explores what these writings reveal, and conceal, about Ireland's medieval past. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 17 March 2015
20th Policy & Politics Annual Lecture: The Politics of Climate Change
Organised by School for Policy Studies
Lord Anthony Giddens.
Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-8:00pm  
Lord Giddens will consider how much progress has been made over the intervening years in containing global warming, arguably one of the greatest threats to a stable future for humanity. Lord Giddens is a world renowned sociologist, a Labour peer and author or editor of 40 books translated into over 40 languages worldwide. Further information is available
Free to attend, but booking required via the online form.  Contact for other queries, telephone: +44 (0)117 954 6755

Tuesday 17 March 2015
A cyborg genealogy: science fiction in the classics
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Dr Genevieve Liveley, Department of Classics.
Clifton Hill House, 7:30pm  
Mythographers of the cyborg often assume that this monstrous hybrid, part-human and part-machine, part-being and part metaphor. This lecture will trace the imaginative history of the cyborg all the way to the ninth century BCE, and map a cyborg genealogy back to the mythical monsters of classical Greece. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended one the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 18 March 2015
The Church and Organised Crime in Italy
Organised by Department of Italian, in association with La Civetta and the International Affairs Society
John Dickie (University College London).
Lecture Theatre 3, School of Chemistry, Cantock's Close, 5:15pm  
Pope Francis recently ex-communicated mafiosi. The fact that Francis is the first Pope ever to have uttered such an ex-communication towards mafiosi is indicative of just how long the Church has been silent - at best - on the mafia issue. In this lecture, John Dickie examines the past and present of the Church-mafia relationship.
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact Professor Jon Foot email: j.foot@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 18 March 2015
Churchill 2015: A different sort of Chancellor? Churchill and the University of Bristol
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Sir David Cannadine FBA, Dodge Professor of History at Princeton University.
Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:30pm  
Throughout his long life, Winston Churchill's attitude to higher education was complex. Professor Sir David Cannadine will explore Churchill's attitudes to higher education in general, and his particular - and unique - relationship with Bristol, of which he was Chancellor from 1929 until his death in 1965. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the online form.  Contact for other queries, Emma Henry email: public-events@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 18 March 2015
Medical Humanities guest lecture: 'Michel Serres' nonmodern Lucretius and the time of reception'
Organised by Faculty of Arts
Brooke Holmes, Professor Classics at Princeton University.
LT1 in the Arts Complex, 4:00pm  
The presentation of an atomic universe in Lucretius' philosophical epic On the nature of things (De rerum natura), has been the subject of extensive work by Michel Serres. Brooke Holmes asks, amongst others, what it means for an ancient poem to be received as "true" in the realm of physics. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact Sam Barlow email: artf-igrct@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 18 March 2015
Long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CBT as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for treatment resistant depression in primary care: a follow-up of the CoBalT trial
Organised by Centre for Academic Mental Health
Dr Nicola Wiles, University of Bristol.
Seminar Room OS6, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, BS8 2BN, 12:30-1:30pm  
Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for depression, including for those individuals whose symptoms have not responded to treatment with antidepressant medication. Further information is available
Free to attend, all welcome, no booking required. Please feel free to bring your own lunch.  Contact Hazel Carrington email: hazel.carrington@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 19 March 2015
Cadavers and computers: the changing face of Medical Anatomy teaching
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Liz Gaze, Centre for Comparative & Clinical Anatomy.
Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, 1:00pm  
How has anatomy teaching changed over the years? This lecture reviews how style and content have developed. How has technology influenced and enhanced the changes? We will look at how both teaching practices and recommendations from the General Medical Council have radically altered the way anatomy is taught at Bristol. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended on the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 19 March 2015
Why we should all grow organic vegetables
Organised by The Botanic Garden
Tim Foster.
The Frank Lecture Theatre, School of Physics, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL., 8:00pm  
Tim's talk will look at the sustainability of food production: why growing vegetables organically is better for us, for the soil and the environment. He will consider the advantages of a de-centralised system, the benefits to us and what we have to do to make it all happen. All in one hour. Further information is available
Free for Friends of the Botanic Garden on production of their membership card. Visitors will be asked to make a donation.  Contact for other queries, the Botanic Garden on +44 (0)117 - 331 4906 or botanic-gardens@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 19 March 2015
Inaugural lecture: Reducing hospital admissions: myth or reality?
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor Sarah Purdy, School of Social and Community Medicine.
E29, Medical Sciences Building, University Walk, BS8 1TD, 6:00-7:00pm  
The need to reduce pressure on hospitals is a priority for the NHS and driving down the number of potentially avoidable admissions is a focus both nationally and locally. We need to better understand who is at risk of admission, which admissions are avoidable and which interventions are effective. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Saturday 21 March 2015
Friends of the University of Bristol Botanic Garden 40th Anniversary Concert
Organised by The Botanic Garden
The Bristol University Singers and The Bristol University Madrigal Ensemble.
The Victoria Rooms, Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1SA, 2:30pm  
A concert of light and classical music to mark the start of celebrations throughout 2015 of 40 years since the formation of the Friends. In addition to the music there will be a display of material from the archives with memories and anecdotes from members. Further information is available
£8 .Early bird available until 31st January offering the second ticket at half price.Tickets are available from the University's Online Shop, or from John Leach, 17 Ashton Crescent, Nailsea BS48 2JR (Telephone: 01275 854992).  Contact for other queries, the Botanic Garden on +44 (0)117 - 331 4906 or botanic-gardens@bristol.ac.uk

Monday 23 March 2015
Inaugural lecture: Life on ice: microbial attack on glaciers
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor Alexandre Anesio, School of Geographical Sciences.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:00pm  
It is now recognised that large expanses of ice in the polar regions are inhabited by active microbial communities forming one of the biomes of Earth. Microbes on ice are diverse, play an important role in the cycling of nutrients and can even modify the physical environment they live. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 24 March 2015
Talk by Shirlene Badger- The things they carry: An ethnography of the translation of whole genome sequencing of pathogens for clinical utility.
Organised by School of Social and Community Medicine
Shirlene Badger, University of Cambridge.
Oakfield House, Room OS6, 12:45-1:45pm  
In the field of clinical microbiology, the databases of pathogens and their associated transmission events are undergoing new techniques providing specific (and at times beautiful) visualisations of genealogy and mobility that extend beyond their history as 'model organisms'. ... full synopsis on website. Further information is available
The seminar is free and all are welcome to come.  Contact Laura Fox on +44 (0)117 - 331 0124 or laura.fox@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 24 March 2015
Veterinary Public Health and your Sunday Roast - the role of vets in the production of safe meat
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Andrew Grist, School of Veterinary Sciences.
Badock Hall, 7:30pm  
In general, as consumers, only a few of us are aware of the veterinary input for the production of safe meat post farm gate. This lecture reviews the role veterinarians play in the meat industry, the laws they enforce on our behalf and some examples of what they protect us from. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended on the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 25 March 2015
Inaugural lecture: "Only (dis)connect": Literary Telephony in European Modernism
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor Robert Vilain, School of Modern Languages.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:00pm  
With illustrations from Kafka, Hofmannsthal, Kraus, Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Marinetti, and many others, Professor Vilain's lecture looks at how early 20th-century European literature represented changes in the mechanisms of communication and social ritual brought about by the telephone, and explores the consequences of such changes for language, the mind, and even the soul. Further information is available
Free to attend and no booking required.  Contact for other queries, Laura Bagley email: laura.bagley@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 26 March 2015
Coleridge Lectures 2015: Animals 'in the Fraternity of universal Nature'
Organised by The Cabot Institute, in association with the Festival of Ideas
Andrew Kelly is director of Bristol Cultural Development Partnership and Bristol Festival of Ideas, and is a visiting professor at the University of the West of England.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:00pm  
In his utopian community the Pantisocracy, Coleridge believed that animals were to be brothers and sisters 'in the Fraternity of universal Nature'. Animal rights and animal welfare were debated widely amongst the Romantics and remain controversial issues today. Andrew Kelly looks at the views of the Romantics and today's campaigns for animals. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the Festival of Ideas website.  Contact for other queries, email: ideas@gwebusinesswest.co.uk

Thursday 26 March 2015
Product design and research with children: supporting children in care
Organised by Best of Bristol Lectures
Dr Debbie Watson, School for Policy Studies.
Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, 1:00pm  
This lecture explores how research with children can support those in care. One such project will be explored in the lecture; providing insights into the co-productive role of children in research and development processes, the challenges of interdisciplinary research, identity maintenance for looked after children and the role of material culture to identity processes. Further information is available on our website
Booking not compulsory, but recommended on the online form.  Contact Best of Bristol Lectures Committee email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

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April 2015

Thursday 2 April 2015
Coleridge Lectures 2015: Re-imagining the City
Organised by The Cabot Institute, in association with the Festival of Ideas
Melissa Harrison worked in non-fiction publishing for several years before moving into magazines with clients including Vogue, Time Out, Stuff and Mixmag. In 2008 she began spending more time on her own writing, and she won the John Muir Trust's Award for Wild Writing in 2010.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:30pm  
Think of 'nature' and most of us think of the deep countryside - but the natural world can live side-by-side with us in cities, too. In a richly imagined journey through one day in a British city, Melissa Harrison brings to life a world that most never know is there. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the Festival of Ideas website.  Contact for other queries, email: ideas@gwebusinesswest.co.uk

Thursday 9 April 2015 -  Saturday 11 April 2015
Association of Art Historians Annual Conference 2015 - Weimar's 'Other': Visual culture in Germany after 1918
Organised by History of Art
Sainsbury Insitute for Art, UEA, Norwich, 9:00am  
This session explores the cultural practice, production and reception of neglected populations both from the Republic's cities, the parallel city of Vienna and the rural provinces, particularly in relation to the themes of sexuality and gender, which have become central to our understanding of Weimar. Further information is available
Contact Billie Woolfenden email: bw13030@bristol.ac.uk

Tuesday 21 April 2015
Churchill 2015: Churchill: Memories of my grandfather
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Celia Sandys.
Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:30pm  
Celia Sandys is an internationally recognised author, speaker and television presenter on the subject of her grandfather, Sir Winston Churchil. Celia will journey through her personal memories of Churchill as a family man including holidaying with him in the Mediterranean and growing up at Chartwell and Chequers. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the online form.  Contact for other queries, Emma Henry email: public-events@bristol.ac.uk

Wednesday 29 April 2015
Churchill 2015: The history man
Organised by Public and Ceremonial Events
Professor David Reynolds, Professor of International History and Chairman of the History Faculty at the University of Cambridge.
Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, 6:00-7:30pm  
Winston Churchill, though renowned as a politician and war leader, earned his living as a writer and won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Professor David Reynolds will reflect on Churchill's historical writings and also consider how a vision of history and of Britain's place in it was central to Churchill's whole worldview as a statesman. Further information is available
Free, but booking required via the online form.  Contact for other queries, Emma Henry email: public-events@bristol.ac.uk

Thursday 30 April 2015
The two faces of heroin: medicine and killer
Organised by School of Physiology and Pharmacology
Professor Graeme Henderson.
Reception Room, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, BS8 1RJ, 6:00pm  
Heroin, and other opioid drugs are used extensively in the treatment of severe pain, but they are also drugs of abuse that are the major cause of death amongst drug addicts. Professor Henderson will discuss advances in opioid pharmacology that may lead to the development of novel therapeutic agents and define dangers of polydrug abuse. Further information is available
Free to attend, but booking required via the online form. A drinks reception will take place after the lecture.  Contact for other queries, on +44 (0)117 - 331 2265 or phph-adminsupport@bristol.ac.uk

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May 2015

Wednesday 13 May 2015
"And for my next trick": Developing an empirically grounded transdiagnostic model and intervention for medically unexplained symptoms
Organised by Centre for Academic Mental Health
Professor Paul Salkovskis.
Seminar Room OS6, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, BS8 2BN, 12:30-1:30pm  
Professor Paul Salkovskis is Professor of Clinical Psychology and Applied Science. In 2010 he was appointed Programme Director for the Clinical Psychology Doctorate Programme at Bath. Previously he was Professor of Clinical Psychology and Applied Science and Clinical Director in the Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma at the Institute of Psychiatry (2000-2010). Further information is available
Free to attend, all welcome, no booking required. Please feel free to bring your own lunch.  Contact Hazel Carrington email: hazel.carrington@bristol.ac.uk

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June 2015

Wednesday 17 June 2015
Neurobiological basis of depression
Organised by Centre for Academic Mental Health
Dr Jonathan Roiser, University College london.
Seminar Room OS6, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, BS8 2BN, 12:30-1:30pm  
Jonathan Roiser studied Natural Sciences at Trinity College, Cambridge, as an undergraduate, and remained there for his doctorate in the Department of Psychiatry. Further information is available
Free to attend, all welcome, no booking required. Please feel free to bring your own lunch.  Contact Hazel Carrington email: hazel.carrington@bristol.ac.uk

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