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  • Neuropilin-1 drives SARS-CoV-2 infectivity, finds breakthrough study 20 October 2020 In a major breakthrough an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has potentially identified what makes SARS-CoV-2 highly infectious and able to spread rapidly in human cells. The findings, published in Science today [20 October] describe how the virus’s ability to infect human cells can be reduced by inhibitors that block a newly discovered interaction between virus and host, demonstrating a potential anti-viral treatment.
  • Discovery of a druggable pocket in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein could stop virus in its tracks 21 September 2020 A druggable pocket in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein that could be used to stop the virus from infecting human cells has been discovered by an international team of scientists led by the University of Bristol. The researchers say their findings, published today [21 September] in the journal Science, are a potential 'game changer' in defeating the current pandemic and add that small molecule anti-viral drugs developed to target the pocket they discovered could help eliminate COVID-19.
  • Success for WBF user in BSCB image competition 14 July 2020
  • New drug formulation could treat Candida infections 28 April 2020 With antimicrobial resistance (AMR) increasing around the world, new research led by the University of Bristol has shown a new drug formulation could possibly be used in antifungal treatments against Candida infections.
  • Insect wings hold antimicrobial clues for improved medical implants 6 April 2020 Some insect wings such as cicada and dragonfly possess nanopillar structures that kill bacteria upon contact. However, to date, the precise mechanisms that cause bacterial death have been unknown.
  • Bristol develops photosynthetic proteins for more sustainable solar-powered devices 24 March 2020 A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has developed a new photosynthetic protein system enabling an enhanced and more sustainable approach to solar-powered technological devices.
  • Catalytic protocells get zingy 8 January 2020 Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts through an international collaboration between the University of Bristol and the University of Padua in Italy.
  • Scientists discover body’s protection shield 18 November 2019 Scientists have discovered a way to manipulate the body’s own immune response to help boost tissue repair. The findings, published in Current Biology today [18 Nov], reveal a new network of protective factors to shield cells against damage. This discovery, made by University of Bristol researchers, could significantly benefit patients undergoing surgery by speeding recovery times and lowering the risk of complication
  • Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics 25 September 2019 A new type of vaccine that can be stored at warmer temperatures, removing the need for refrigeration, has been developed for mosquito-borne virus Chikungunya in a major advance in vaccine technology. The findings, published in Science Advances today [Wednesday 25 September], reveal exceptionally promising results for the Chikungunya vaccine candidate, which has been engineered using a synthetic protein scaffold that could revolutionise the way vaccines are designed, produced and stored.
  • Putting the squeeze on red blood cells 11 September 2019 For the first time, researchers at the University of Bristol’s Blood and Transplant Research Unit, and the French National Institute for Blood Transfusion, have captured the moment a red blood cell is ‘squeezed’ while recording the changes that allow it to deform and subsequently recover its shape.
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