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GPs and pharmacists don't have time to involve patients in medication reviews 12 February 2019 GPs and pharmacists struggle to find the time to involve patients in medication reviews, despite National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance advising them to do so, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care.
  • GPs and pharmacists don't have time to involve patients in medication reviews 12 February 2019 GPs and pharmacists struggle to find the time to involve patients in medication reviews, despite National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance advising them to do so, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care.
  • Children’s respiratory infections can last up to three weeks 23 January 2019 Children’s respiratory infection symptoms, including runny nose, dry cough and sore throat, can seem never-ending. Researchers from the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care have found that it can take up to three weeks for 90 per cent of children’s respiratory infection symptoms to resolve, with one in 12 parents seeking help from their GP.
  • NIHR School for Primary Care Research Medical Student Internships 2019: Bristol 17 January 2019 These research internships will be based in the Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC) at Bristol Medical School. The successful applicants will join established research teams and gain skills in primary care focused research which may include research methods training, attendance at workshops and seminars, secondary data analysis and literature reviewing.
  • General Practice Career Progression Fellowships 2019 16 January 2019 School for Primary Care Research - Increasing the evidence base for primary care practice
  • NHS 10-year plan: Researchers warn online GP consultations need careful implementation and rigorous evaluation before widespread adoption 14 January 2019 The new NHS 10-year plan launched on 7 January states all patients in England will have access to a 'digital first primary care offer', such as GP online consultations, by 2022/23. Online consultations have the potential to improve patient access and reduce face-to-face contacts, freeing up GP time. But research led by NIHR CLAHRC West and the Centre for Academic Primary Care at the University of Bristol found that unless these systems are carefully implemented, they won’t yield the benefits policymakers are hoping for.
  • Low cost, low risk intervention could help improve the care of patients who make frequent visits to their GP 11 January 2019 Training GPs in a consultation technique designed to find out about the wider context to patients’ problems, and support patient knowledge, skills and confidence to self-care, is feasible and could reduce costs, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care.
  • Designing health care for the people who need it 20 December 2018 Professor Chris Salisbury’s 2018 RCGP James Mackenzie Lecture
  • Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse 4 December 2018 Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse.
  • New psychological intervention proves ‘life-changing’ for women experiencing domestic abuse 27 November 2018 Training domestic violence and abuse (DVA) advocates to deliver psychological support to women experiencing DVA could significantly improve the health of those affected. In a randomised controlled trial led by researchers from the University of Bristol, women who received the intervention showed reduced symptoms of psychological distress, depression and post-traumatic stress compared to those who received just advocacy.
  • New study aims to reduce the use of oral antibiotics for ear infections in children 16 November 2018 Middle ear infections, known medically as acute otitis media (AOM), are common painful infections in children, for which there are up to three million treatment episodes in England and Wales each year. They are often treated with antibiotics by mouth. However, these can cause side effects like rashes, diarrhoea and vomiting, and their over-use contributes to the growing global health threat of antibiotic resistance.
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