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Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse 4 December 2018 Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse.
  • Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse 4 December 2018 Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse.
  • New psychological intervention proves ‘life-changing’ for women experiencing domestic abuse 27 November 2018 Training domestic violence and abuse (DVA) advocates to deliver psychological support to women experiencing DVA could significantly improve the health of those affected. In a randomised controlled trial led by researchers from the University of Bristol, women who received the intervention showed reduced symptoms of psychological distress, depression and post-traumatic stress compared to those who received just advocacy.
  • New study aims to reduce the use of oral antibiotics for ear infections in children 16 November 2018 Middle ear infections, known medically as acute otitis media (AOM), are common painful infections in children, for which there are up to three million treatment episodes in England and Wales each year. They are often treated with antibiotics by mouth. However, these can cause side effects like rashes, diarrhoea and vomiting, and their over-use contributes to the growing global health threat of antibiotic resistance.
  • More adults are using complementary and alternative medicine in England but access is unequal, finds survey 14 November 2018 Use of practitioner-led complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as acupuncture, massage, osteopathy and chiropractic treatment, rose from 12% of the population in 2005 to 16% of the population in 2015, according to a survey led by researchers at the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care. However, access to these treatments was unequal, with women, those who are better off and those in the south of England more likely to use CAM.
  • Popular drug combination for treatment resistant depression is not more effective than a single antidepressant in primary care 1 November 2018 Psychiatrists and GPs increasingly combine mirtazapine with an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) or SNRI (serotonin-noradenaline reuptake inhibitor) antidepressant for patients whose depression does not respond to a single antidepressant. A large clinical trial led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Exeter, Keele, Manchester and Hull York Medical School, and published in the British Medical Journal today, looked at the effectiveness of adding mirtazapine to an SSRI or SNRI in patients who remain depressed after at least six weeks of conventional (SSRI or SNRI) antidepressant treatment. They found that this combination was no more effective in improving depression than placebo and call on doctors to rethink its use.
  • Experts call for health system change to tackle the challenge of multimorbidity in the NHS 25 October 2018 The number of people with multiple long-term conditions, known as multimorbidity, is rising internationally, putting increased pressure on health care systems, including the NHS. Researchers from the 3D Study – the largest ever trial of a person-centred approach to caring for patients with multimorbidity in primary care - at the Universities of Bristol, Dundee, Manchester and Glasgow, are hosting a conference today [Thursday 25 October] with the Royal College of General Practitioners to discuss the challenges facing general practice and how the health care system needs to respond.
  • New study will help GPs recognise the early stages of psychosis 10 October 2018 GPs need to be able to recognise the early stages of a psychotic illness and quickly refer to specialist mental health services for treatment.
  • Risks of using algorithms to predict child abuse 20 September 2018 In a letter published in The Guardian today, Professor Gene Feder, a GP and domestic violence and abuse research lead at the Centre for Academic Primary Care, has highlighted the risks of local authorities using algorithms to predict child abuse risk in social care.
  • Multimorbidity Conference: the challenge for primary care – 25 October 2018 14 September 2018 The Centre for Academic Primary Care has joined with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) to deliver a conference on the challenges GPs face in providing care to patients with multiple long-term conditions.
  • Prescribing antibiotics for children with cough in general practice does not reduce the risk of hospitalisation 11 September 2018 Doctors and nurses often prescribe antibiotics for children with cough and respiratory infection to avoid return visits, symptoms getting worse or hospitalisation. In a study published in the British Journal of General Practice today [Tuesday 11 September], researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Southampton, Oxford and Kings College London found little evidence that antibiotics reduce the risk of children with cough ending up in hospital, suggesting that this is an area in which unnecessary antibiotic prescribing could be reduced.
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