Final Year (including individual project)

In the final-year your lectures include your choice of option units and you undertake an individual research project. This is where you benefit most from studying in a world-leading research department. This includes access to state-of-the-art, multi-million pound laboratories, and industrially aware project supervisors.

The Department requires all its graduating students to undertake a final-year project at the cutting edge of technology. You can chose from a list of around 100 projects.

Recent examples

  • A Hybrid Solar-Powered Electric Vehicle
  • Piezo-Electric Energy Scavenging
  • Photon Detector Modules
  • Simple Sources for Quantum Cryptography
  • A Multimedia Distribution Platform
  • Analysis of Paintings using a Multi-Sensorial Visual and Haptic Display
  • Breast Tumour detection using Focused Microwaves
  • An Iris Recognition System
  • Surface-Emitting Lasers
  • Capacity Evaluation for 4G cellular systems

Most students choose a project that is close to their own interests and career plans, and many find the experiences gained during their project to be valuable not only in job applications, but throughout their future careers. Some students find their project so interesting they decide to stay in education by studying for a PhD.

In the final-year the Department offers a weekly seminar programme. Professional engineers from industry are invited to talk about recent and future developments in their own areas of work. This provides a valuable insight into current engineering challenges and job opportunities, and also into the range of careers available to graduate engineers.

Support for employment before and after graduation is provided by the University Careers Advisory Service.

In the following video library a number of final-year students talk about their final-year projects.

The Anechoic chamber is part of our multi-million pound communications laboratory and is used by undergraduates to characterise antenna systems.

We sometimes get in visiting lecturers talking about their cutting-edge research and I can sit there in the lecture room and think ‘I was taught that on Monday’. That’s really why I enjoy being taught at Bristol.

Jason Shaw, Electrical and Electronic Engineering (MEng), Year 4.

I would recommend people come to Bristol University because I’ve had such a great 3 years and I think other people should have the same.

Tom Mitchell, Electrical and Electronic Engineering (MEng), Year 3.