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Ancient marine sediments provide clues to future climate change 25 April 2016 Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration was the major driver behind the global climatic shifts that occurred 53 to 34 million years ago, according to new research led by the University of Southampton, the University of Bristol and Cardiff University.
  • Ancient marine sediments provide clues to future climate change 25 April 2016 Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration was the major driver behind the global climatic shifts that occurred 53 to 34 million years ago, according to new research led by the University of Southampton, the University of Bristol and Cardiff University.
  • A trick of the light may help diseased plants attract greenfly 21 April 2016 The leaves of virus-infected plants reflect light differently to attract the attention of disease-spreading greenfly, new research suggests.
  • Bristol researcher joins new deep-sea ecosystem study 19 April 2016 Dr Kate Hendry, Royal Society Research Fellow in the School of Earth Sciences, has joined an EU-funded project to examine the ecology and diversity of deep-sea sponge ecosystems in the North Atlantic.
  • Professor Alex Anesio, 2016 EAG Distinguished Lecturer 15 April 2016 We are proud and delighted to announce that Cabot Institute member Professor Alex Anesio has been chosen as the 2016 Distinguished Lecturer by the European Association of Geochemistry (EAG). The distinguished lecturer is selected each year based on a combination of outstanding research contributions to geochemistry and the ability to clearly communicate these contributions to a broad audience.
  • Connecting communities and researchers to build powerful knowledge 14 April 2016 Results of research to discover how communities are changing will be presented at an event in London today.
  • Consensus on consensus confirms 97 per cent of experts are convinced people are changing the climate 14 April 2016 Ninety-seven per cent of climate scientists agree global warming is caused by people, a new study by an international team of researchers, including Professor Stephan Lewandowsky of the University of Bristol, has confirmed.
  • Fertilizer’s legacy: taking a toll on land and water 13 April 2016 For the first time, an international group of scientists, has come up with a way to estimate on a large scale how phosphorus flows through an environment over many decades. The research team, including the University of Bristol, found the UK is using less fertilizer to grow food and that both historically and currently, it is a world leader in modern wastewater treatment.
  • Bristol scientists fly drone over Old Trafford to research landmine clearance 5 April 2016 University of Bristol scientists researching how drones can be used to speed up landmine clearance will fly a drone over Old Trafford today [Monday 4 April] – UN International Day for Mine Awareness – to demonstrate how large, football pitch-sized areas can be mapped quickly.
  • Cities lead on climate change 1 April 2016 The need to mitigate climate change opens up a key role for cities. Bristol’s year as a Green Capital led to great strides forward, but it also revealed that a creative and determined partnership across cultural divides will be necessary.
  • Human carbon release rate unprecedented in past 66 million years 24 March 2016 Humans are releasing carbon about 10 times faster than during any event in the past 66 million years, according to new research from the University of Hawaii, the University of Bristol and the University of California, published in Nature Geoscience.
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