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Severe droughts no longer caused just by nature 2 February 2016 A group of key water researchers from 13 organisations in eight countries, including the University of Bristol and Cabot Institute, is calling for a revision of how the world should study and tackle drought. The researchers propose broadening the definition of drought to include water shortage caused and made worse – or sometimes improved - by human activity.
  • Ocean acidification makes coralline algae less robust 8 February 2016 Ocean acidification (the ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth’s oceans, caused by the uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere), is affecting the formation of the skeleton of coralline algae which play an important part in marine biodiversity, new research from the University of Bristol has found.
  • Bristol Team places fifth in international Drones for Good awards 8 February 2016 Dr Tom Scott and Dr Oliver Payton, with Bristol spin-out company ImiTec Ltd, took their Advanced Airborne Radiation Monitoring System to Dubai and took on 1017 entrants from 165 countries.
  • Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage 5 February 2016 The rate that fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby, according to pioneering work led by the University of Exeter and co-authored by the University of Bristol, published today in Nature Communications.
  • Exploring the genomic basis of parasitism 3 February 2016 The genes that cause parasitism in a group of intestinal worms, responsible for one of most prevalent tropical diseases in the developing world, have been identified by an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol.
  • New frontiers in communication systems 3 February 2016 Data centres such as the ones used by Google and Facebook are the fundamental backbone for a range of services and applications including cloud and fog computing, big data, Internet of Things (IoT), social networking, weather forecasting, earthquake and tsunami prediction and cyber security. As such they are a hidden, yet integral part of modern life and human progress. New research by the universities of Bristol, Keio and industrial partners have unlocked 80 THz of fibre-optic bandwidth that will enable future exascale data centres and transform 5G networks.
  • Greenland ice sheet releasing “Mississippi River” worth of phosphorus 3 February 2016 Not only is Greenland's melting ice sheet adding huge amounts of water to the oceans, it could also be unleashing 400,000 metric tons of phosphorus every year – as much as the mighty Mississippi River releases into the Gulf of Mexico, according to a new study.
  • Loss of wild flowers across Britain matches pollinator decline 3 February 2016 The first ever Britain-wide assessment of the value of wild flowers as food for pollinators, led by the University of Bristol, shows that decreasing resources mirror the decline of pollinating insects, providing new evidence to support the link between plant and pollinator decline.
  • Severe droughts no longer caused just by nature 2 February 2016 A group of key water researchers from 13 organisations in eight countries, including the University of Bristol and Cabot Institute, is calling for a revision of how the world should study and tackle drought. The researchers propose broadening the definition of drought to include water shortage caused and made worse – or sometimes improved - by human activity.
  • Government grant fuels development of autonomous vehicles 1 February 2016 The University of Bristol, as part of the FLOURISH consortium, is among the recipients of the government’s multi-million pound research grant to fuel development in user-centric autonomous vehicle technology and connected transport systems. The new programme, co-funded by the UK’s innovation agency - Innovate UK, will focus on the core themes of wireless connectivity, security and customer interaction.
  • Global security experts call for comprehensive debate ahead of Trident replacement decision 26 January 2016 The UK Government should use the current decision on replacing Trident to encourage a serious public debate about the UK’s nuclear status, leading academics have said. Researchers from the universities of Bristol and Birmingham, and King’s College London, argue in a new report that a decision to go ahead with replacing Trident would commit the UK to nuclear weapons for the foreseeable future, at a time when anti-nuclear voices in mainstream British politics are at their strongest in a generation.
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