News

Sustainable fisheries, food security: lessons from tilapia fish in Tanzania 14 September 2018 Fish production is increasing to meet the protein demands of a growing human population. However, cross-breeding large-bodied native species with small-bodied non-native species can reduce yields and lead to loss of unique biodiversity, with negative consequences for food security.
  • Sustainable fisheries, food security: lessons from tilapia fish in Tanzania 14 September 2018 Fish production is increasing to meet the protein demands of a growing human population. However, cross-breeding large-bodied native species with small-bodied non-native species can reduce yields and lead to loss of unique biodiversity, with negative consequences for food security.
  • New research could reduce primate electrocutions and help conservation strategies 5 September 2018 New research has mapped and analysed the incidence of primate electrocutions in Diani, Kenya to identify hotspot areas that should be prioritised to reduce the risk of electric shock. The study could also inform conservation strategies in other parts of the world where primate electrocutions are common. Electrocution threatens a wide range of primate species across the world and the hazard could become more widespread as species are increasingly restricted to human-dominated landscapes.
  • Evolutionary origins of animal biodiversity 4 September 2018 A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has revealed the origins and evolution of animal body plans.
  • Russian connections of reptile from the Jurassic Coast 30 August 2018 The Triassic red rocks of the Devon coast around Sidmouth, some 240 million years old and pre-dating the earliest dinosaurs preserve fossil fishes, amphibians and reptiles, and a new specimen, uncovered with help from palaeontologists at the University of Bristol, shows distinct connections with Russia.
  • Climate change increasing the prevalence of harmful parasite, warn scientists 29 August 2018 A rise in a parasite called liver fluke, which can significantly impact livestock production in farms in the UK and across the world, could now be helped by a new predictive model of the disease aimed at farmers. The tool, developed by University of Bristol scientists, aims to help reduce prevalence of the disease.
  • Where would we 'bee' without pollinators? 29 August 2018 Without pollinators there would be no strawberries, apples and chocolate. At this weekend's Bee Festival at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden people will be able to find out how they can help bees and other vital pollinators or learn about growing fruit and vegetables. The Festival will also celebrate the 90th anniversary of the Avon Beekeepers Association Annual Honey Show.
  • A timescale for the origin and evolution of all of life on Earth 21 August 2018 A new study led by scientists from the University of Bristol has used a combination of genomic and fossil data to explain the history of life on Earth, from its origin to the present day.
  • To float or not to float? Mystery solved as to why algae balls float and sink 21 August 2018 Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered the age-old mystery of why marimo algae balls sink at night and float during the day.
  • New Director for Cabot Institute for the Environment 6 August 2018 The University of Bristol’s Cabot Institute for the Environment has appointed a new Director.
  • Eavesdropping birds learn meaning of foreign alarm calls just by listening 3 August 2018 Birds often eavesdrop on the alarm calls of other species, making it possible for them to take advantage of many eyes looking out for danger. Now, researchers have found that fairy-wrens can learn those unfamiliar calls—which they liken to a foreign language—even without ever seeing the bird that made the call or the predator that provoked it.
Years iterator 2009201020112012201320142015201620172018
View all news
Edit this page