Knowing your enemy (and your friends): Cultures of radio monitoring and surveillance

15 - 16 September 2016, University of York

During this workshop participants explored cross-border radio propaganda and practices of surveillance, and evidence produced by contemporary radio monitoring and audience research. Surviving data concerning audience behaviour needs to be treated with caution: it was created for a particular political purpose. This problem was considered by encouraging an interdisciplinary approach, involving scholars of radio history, auditory cultures, audience reception and geopolitics. 

You can download the full programme at the link below:

York workshop (PDF, 394kB)

This workshop featured presentation by the following network members and invited speakers and ended with a round table discussion:

  • Dr Kay Chadwick, Reader in French Historical Studies, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Liverpool
  • Morgan Corriou, Lecturer, Paris 8 University
  • Dr Friederike Kind-Kovacs, Assistant Professor, Department of Southeast-and East European History, University of Regensberg and Co-Investigator, Connecting the Wireless World
  • Dr Vincent Kuitenbrouwer, Assistant Professor of the History of International Relations, University of Amsterdam and Co-Investigator, Connecting the Wireless World
  • A. Ross Johnson, Senior Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center and Visiting Fellow, Hoover Institution
  • Dr Simon Potter, Reader in Modern History, University of Bristol
  • Dr Nelson Ribeiro, Associate Professor in Communication Studies at the Catholic University of Portugal
  • Dr Linda Risso, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Historical Research in London
  • Dr Rebecca Scales, Associate Professor of History at the Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Professor Jean Seaton, Professor of Media History, University of Westminster, and the Official Historian of the BBC
  • Dr Andrea Stanton, Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Denver
  • Dr Alban Webb, Lecturer in Digital Humanities (Media and Film), University of Sussex.


Edit this page