While studying Engineering Design at Bristol I did a lot of stuff. In no particular order I: learned to code; used imaginary numbers to make real stuff; designed maze escaping robots; simulated overlapping waveforms; wrote an essay about the economy of Taiwan; took a lot of meeting minutes; passed thermofluids 1; almost failed thermofluids 2; repaired oxygen concentrators in Tanzania; presented at the University of Nigeria; cited research on stab wounds; built a 5 ton, 1:1 scale model train; was invited to the Houses of Parliament; conformed to ISO Standards; ran an Engineering society; served two years as a charity trustee; made friends; designed a leg exoskeleton, an RC car and a drone swarm and topped it off by graduating with First Class Honours.

There are a lot of reasons to study Engineering Design, but a good one is that it gives you a platform to build your interests on top of. A lot of the best things I did while at university weren’t in lectures or labs, but all the while, the structure and knowledge from the course was enabling me to succeed in other ventures, working with Engineers Without Borders and later Engineering World Health. The course also got me my job at a leading product design company, DCA, who I returned to after graduating and a second stint working in Tanzania. It’s easy to retrospectively assign what I know about the course now to my decision-making process in sixth form, but basically I was just doing Maths, Physics and Product Design at A Level, and the course was in my grade range. Above all, the course is good at developing young people into leaders within the engineering industries and beyond, so if you want to make the world a better place, it can start you on a path to doing so. 

Conor McGlacken 2016, Mechanical Engineer
Conor McGlacken 2016, Mechanical Engineer

Conor McGlacken

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