Gallery

This is a collection of images related to the Neural Dynamics programme which we have used at some point as the front image.

Bursting in a simple neuronal network

You would think the dynamics of two inhibitory neurons, each inhibiting the other with depressing synaapses, would be simple, in fact it is very rich and complicated; this is the phase diagram for bursting behaviour in the system as the coupling is increased, part of Neural Dynamics student Mark Olenik's work on struggling in tadpoles.

2017 students 


The new 2017 Neural Dynamics students, along with some of the other students, gathered for the annual photograph beside the Follow Me sculture in the Royal Fort Gardens.

2017 TRENDS summer school

Students from the 2017 TRENDS summer school visiting Mike Ashby's lab.

Students attending the 2017 TRENDS summer school visit Mike Ashby's lab.

Claire Hales: PhD cake

PhD viva celebration cake for Claire Hales, PhD cakes are a Robinson lab tradition, made for her by her lab mates Christian Wood and Caroline Phelps,

Students September 2016

 

Neural Dynamics students standing in the Royal Fort Gardens.

Each year when the new students arrive we have a tradition of photographing all the students in front of the sculpture Follow Me by Jeppe Hein in the Royal Fort Gardens. This is the photograph from September 2015.

Circuit Diagram for the Dentate Gyrus

 

A diagram of the dentate gyrus.

Schematic of Dentate Gyrus circuitry between Granule cells (GC), Mossy Cells (MC) and Interneurons (IN). Inputs carrying spatial information arrive from the entorhinal cortex along the perforant pathway (PP) and synapse with granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Granule cell mossy fibres then collateralise in the hilus and  synapse with mossy cells and interneurons. Mossy cells provide excitatory feedback to GCs via monosynaptic projections to the Inner molecular layer (IML) as well as disynaptic inhibitory feedback via interneurons (INT). The net impact of mossy cells on granule cell activity is still unknown.

[From Katarina Kolaric a Neural Dynamics student working with Denise Atan, Zafar Bashir and Robert Szalai]

A Granule Cell

 

A granule cell from the dentate gyrus.

A Biocytin labelled granule cell from an adult mouse hippocampus. Biocytin is an anatomical tracer of neuronal cells. By filling cells with biocytin during whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology recordings the dendritic branching and morphology of a cell can be imaged using immunohistochemistry. Here you can see projections from the cell body in the granule cell layer into the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus where perforant pathway inputs arrive from the entorhinal cortex and synapse onto granule cells. It is also possible to visualise dendritic spines along the length of the dendrites. (Green = Biocytin; Blue = DAPI (a nuclear cell marker)).

[From Katarina Kolaric a Neural Dynamics student working with Denise Atan, Zafar Bashir and Robert Szalai]

Penguin Battle

 

Neural Dynamics student Felicity Inkpen psychs out and defeats a senior academic in Penguin Fight at our retreat.

Blood vessels in the brain

 

1: Time of Flight Angiogram of the circle of Willis
2: Phase contrast Angiography performed at the level of the basilar and internal carotid arteries

L: Time of Flight Angiogram of the circle of Willis

R: Phase contrast Angiography performed at the level of the basilar and internal carotid arteries.

[From Sandra Berlau-Neumann, a Neural Dynamics student working with Jon Brooks and Emma Hart.]

Blackboard discussion

 

Picture of a blackboard being used by Neural Dynamics student Mark Olenik and Conor Houghton, one of his supervisors, to discuss the neural substrate for struggling behaviour in tadpoles. These calculations related to a simplified model of how the neuronal network in the tadpole's tail might support struggling behaviour.

An Optogram

 

A novel graph used to visualise many complex spike waveforms from a single Purkinje cell recording simultaneously (n=178 action potentials).

A novel graph used to visualise many complex spike waveforms from a single Purkinje cell recording simultaneously. Each vertical bar represents a single complex spike waveform, which has been colour-coded for voltage, so that red represents the most depolarised potentials and black the most hyperpolarised. Voltages within this range are colour coded from highest to lowest with the colours of the rainbow, so that orange represents high voltages and blue represents low voltages.

[From Amelia Burroughs, a Neural Dynamics student supervised by Richard Apps and Conor Houghton.]

Migrating Neuroblasts

 

Neuroblasts migrating out of the cochleovestibular ganglion in culture, with tissue taken from an embryonic mouse at 9.5 days of development. Electrophysiology will be used to study the electrical properties of the neuroblasts as they proceed along the developmental pathway in this system. (original magnification 100x).

[From Jack Curran, a Neural Dynamics student doing a rotation with Helen Kennedy and Martin Homer.]

Biocytin labelled CA1 pyramidal cell

 

A Biocytin labelled CA1 pyramidal cell from a P14 rat hippocampus - from Katarina Kolaric

A Biocytin labelled CA1 pyramidal cell from a P14 rat hippocampus. Biocytin is an anatomical tracer of neuronal cells. By filling cells with biocytin during whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology recordings, the dendritic branching and morphology of a cell can be imaged. Here you can see local dendritic branching as well as projecting apical and basal dendrites away from the CA1 pyramidal layer.

[From Katarina Kolaric, a Neural Dynamics student supervised by Denize Atan, Zafar Bashir and Robert Szalai.]

Students September 2015

 

Each year when the new students arrive we have a tradition of photographing all the students in front of the sculpture Follow Me by Jeppe Hein in the Royal Fort Gardens. This is the photograph from September 2015.

Cerebellum and locus coeruleus.

 

This shows a noradrenergic axonal fibre traversing through the cerebellar cortex. This fibre expresses the channel rhodopsin2 protein following the bilateral injection of a virus, which is tagged to the mCherry fluorophore, into locus coeruleus. Putative Purkinje cell bodies are highlighted by the dotted boundaries.

[From Amelia Burroughs, a Neural Dynamics student supervised by Richard Apps and Conor Houghton.]

Purkinje cells from a patient with multiple sclerosis.

 

Purkinje cells within the cerebellum of patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Post-mortem tissue was immunofluorescently labelled with a Purkinje cell specific marker, Calbindin D28K (green) and DAPI nuclear stain (blue). It has been taken using a confocal fluorescent microscope.

Post-mortem tissue was immunofluorescently labelled with a Purkinje cell specific marker, Calbindin D28K (green) and DAPI nuclear stain (blue) and photographed using a confocal fluorescent microscope.

[From Clare Kennedy, a Neural Dynamics students doing a rotation with Neil Scolding, Kevin Kemp and Marc Goodfellow.]

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