Speaker Biographies

Key Note Speakers

Gerd Gigerenzer

Gerd Gigerenzer

Gerd Gigerenzer is director at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Director of the Harding Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin. Previous positions he held include Professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago and John M. Olin Distinguished Visiting Professor, School of Law at the University of Virginia. He is also a member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and the German Academy of Sciences, and Batten Fellow at the Darden Business School, University of Virginia. He received honorary doctorates from the University of Basel and the Open University of the Netherlands. Awards for his work include the AAAS Prize for the best article in the behavioral sciences, the Association of American Publishers Prize for the best book in the social and behavioral sciences, the German Psychology Award, and the Communicator Award of the German Research Foundation. His award-winning popular books Calculated Risks, Gut Feelings: The Intelligence of the Unconscious, and Risk Savvy: How to make good decisions have been translated into 18 languages. His academic books include Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart, Rationality for Mortals, and Bounded Rationality: The Adaptive Toolbox (with Reinhard Selten, a Nobel Laureate in economics). In Better Doctors, Better Patients, Better Decisions (with Sir Muir Gray) he shows how better informed doctors and patients can improve healthcare while reducing costs. Together with the Bank of England, he is working on the project “Simple heuristics for a safer world.” Gigerenzer has trained U.S. federal judges, German physicians, and top managers in decision making and understanding risks and uncertainties.

Tom Griffiths

Tom Griffiths

Tom Griffiths is Associate Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research explores the mathematical principles behind human cognition. By focusing on the computational problems posed by everyday life and deriving their ideal solutions, his work identifies links between psychology, computer science, and statistics. He has received early career awards from the United States National Science Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, the Society for Mathematical Psychology, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, and the Psychonomic Society.

Antonio Rangel

Antonio Rangel

Antonio Rangel is the Bing Professor of Neuroscience, Behavioral Biology and Economics at Caltech. He received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University in 1998, and was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Stanford from 1998 to 2006, as well as a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has been at Caltech since 2006, when he switched the focus of his work from economics to decision neuroscience. The Rangel Neuroeconomics Laboratory studies the computational and neurobiological basis of decision-making, and the applications of this knowledge to economics, psychiatry and the development of ‘neurotechnologies’ designed to improve decision-making. Their most basic work has focused on understanding how the brain computes and compares values make simple choices, such as choosing between an apple and an orange. They have also investigated how the workings of the decision-making system change in more complex forms of choice, such as decisions involving self-control (e.g., apple or chocolate cake?) or altruism (e.g., $ for me or $ for another person?). He is a past president of the Society for Neuroeconomics.

Jeffrey D. Schall

Jeffrey D. Schall

Jeffrey D. Schall is the E. Bronson Ingram Professor of Neuroscience at Vanderbilt University where he has risen through the ranks since 1989. Schall earned a Ph.D. in Anatomy at the University of Utah, where he investigated how the structure of retinal ganglion cells produced functional properties like orientation selectivity in visual cortex of rats, cats, ferrets and monkeys. Schall's postdoctoral training in the Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences at MIT produced the first comparison of the functional properties of two eye movement areas in the frontal lobe, the first description of the innervation of the basal ganglia by these two cortical areas and the first demonstration of a neural correlate of consciousness. Schall’s research, supported by grants from the National Eye Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, focuses on how the brain makes decisions and controls actions. His research accomplishments have been recognized by awards from the Alfred P. Sloan foundation, the James S. McDonnell foundation and the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience. In 1998 he received the Troland Research Award from the National Academy of Sciences. He is a fellow of the Association of Psychological Science. Beyond his research, Schall directs the Vanderbilt Vision Research Center as well as the Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience. Most recently, Schall’s interests in the implications of his research led to participation in the MacArthur Law and Neuroscience Project.

Invited Talks

Nick Chater

Nick Chater

Nick Chater is Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School. He is interested in rational explanations of mind and behaviour. He has over 200 publications, has won four national awards for psychological research, and has served as Associate Editor for the journals Cognitive Science, Psychological Review, and Psychological Science. He was elected a Fellow of the Cognitive Science Society in 2010 and a Fellow of the British Academy in 2012. Nick is co-founder of the research consultancy Decision Technology; and is on the advisory board of the Cabinet Office's Behavioural Insight Team (BIT), popularly know as the ‘Nudge Unit'. He presents an on-line open course (MOOC) "The Mind is Flat."

Eric-Jan Wagenmakers

Eric-Jan Wagenmakers

Eric-Jan (EJ) Wagenmakers is a full professor at the Psychological Methods Unit of the University of Amsterdam. His work concerns Bayesian inference, philosophy of science, mathematical models of cognition, and model-based cognitive neuroscience. Together with other mathematical psychologists, Dr. Wagenmakers takes great pleasure in explaining, at length, how popular statistical procedures are incorrect, unfounded, and potentially misleading.

Daniel Wolpert

Daniel Wolpert

Daniel Wolpert read medical sciences at Cambridge and clinical medicine at Oxford. He completed a PhD in the Physiology Department at Oxford and was a postdoctoral fellow at MIT, before moving to the Institute of Neurology, UCL. In 2005 he took up the post of Professor of Engineering at the University of Cambridge and was made a  Fellow of Trinity College. He was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2004 and was awarded the Royal Society Francis Crick Prize Lecture (2005), the Minerva Foundation Golden Brain Award (2010) and gave the Fred Kavli Distinguished International Scientist Lecture at the Society for Neuroscience (2009). In 2012 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) and made a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator. In 2013 he was appointed to the Royal Society Noreen Murray Research Professorship in Neurobiology. His research interests are computational and experimental approaches to human sensorimotor control (www.wolpertlab.com).