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HEA Fellowship for Bristol Biochemistry Senior Teaching Fellow 2 February 2016 Dr Gus Cameron, from the School of Biochemistry, has been made a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in recognition of his established record in teaching and learning.
  • HEA Fellowship for Bristol Biochemistry Senior Teaching Fellow 2 February 2016 Dr Gus Cameron, from the School of Biochemistry, has been made a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in recognition of his established record in teaching and learning.
  • BTec students solve forensic mystery in Bristol Biochemistry 17 December 2015 On 9th December 2015, BTec students from North Bristol Post-16 Centre visited the School of Biochemistry Teaching labs to try their hand at biochemistry research techniques and solve a forensics scenario.
  • Art of Science 2015 20 November 2015
  • Ada Lovelace day 20 November 2015 On the 18th November, the Equality & Diversity and Widening Participation offices welcomed over 100 schoolchildren to take part in a Science Showcase as part of the University's celebrations of Ada Lovelace's 200th birthday.
  • Making Movies: Biochemistry research showcased as video synopsis 28 October 2015
  • Bristol Biochemistry undergraduate student wins poster prize 7 October 2015 Congratulations to Rebecca Dixon-Steele, one of our final year undergraduate students, on winning the best poster prize at the Drug Discovery 2015 conference in Telford, organised by ELRIG. Rebecca gave a 10 minute presentation in a poster taster session in the ‘Innovation in Assay Development and Screening’ track, winning her the best poster prize.
  • DNA shredding by a bacterial enzyme 22 September 2015 The integrity of the genetic information stored in DNA relies on maintenance of its double-stranded structure. Nonetheless, cells sometimes need to break DNA by cutting each of the polynucleotide strands. These DNA cleavage events are catalysed by enzymes called nucleases; nature’s molecular scissors. Many nucleases are complexes of two proteins, one subunit to cut each DNA strand (i.e., each subunit is a blade of the molecular scissors). A dimer structure ensures that the cuts are close together, leading to a simple DNA break. A collaboration between research teams in Bristol and Pune, India, has now revealed an alternative mechanism, where a pair of nuclease subunits are held distantly apart and the DNA cleavage is more ragged.
  • Bristol to benefit from new £3M Blood and Transplant Research Unit 11 September 2015 A new £3 million NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit [BTRU] to advance pioneering research on the manufacture of red blood cells from stem cells and their translation from the lab to human trials has been announced today [11 September 2015].
  • Welcome Imré and Christiane 11 September 2015 Bristol Biochemistry extends a very warm welcome to our two recent Professorial appointments, Imré Berger and Christiane Berger-Schaffitzel.
  • Biochemist announced as winner of BBC science writing competition 5 August 2015 Aspiring writers were invited to submit a 700-word article on ‘The science that will transform our future’ under two categories: ‘20 and under’ and ‘Over 21’.
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