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Professor Becky Whay

Professor Becky Whay

Professor Becky Whay
B.Sc.Hons (Leeds), Ph.D.(Bristol), NDA

Professor of Animal Welfare and Behaviour

Area of research

Animal Welfare Research

Dolberry Building,
Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU
(See a map)

+44 (0) 117 928 9474

Summary

 

Animal Welfare Research

 

Research keywords 

  • • Animal Welfare Assessment • Investigating risk factors for animal welfare problems • Developing methodologies for implementing animal welfare improvement • Animal and Human welfare in the developing world

 

Research findings

Current Projects Include:Risk factors for lameness in working equids [in India & Pakistan]Implementation of existing knowledge to reduce lameness in dairy cattlePain perception and analgesia in donkeysDetection and treatment if digital dermatitis in UK dairy cattleRabies and reproduction control in roaming dogs in the developing worldA review of equine welfare in England & WalesThe welfare of vulnerable equines in South WalesAttitudes of UK veterinary practitioners to pain relief in cats and dogsThe welfare of donated cattle and goats in rural African communities

 

 

 

Biography

Teaches
BVSc Veterinary Science

Meeting with horse owners in India

Becky was awarded her PhD from the University of Bristol in 1998 following work to improve methods of pain relief for UK dairy cattle, a field in which she continues to work.  She is now International Director for the Faculty of Health Sciences and a Senior leader within Bristol Veterinary School. In addition she leads a research team within the Animal Welfare and Behaviour research group.  Her research focusses on the welfare of UK dairy cattle and working equids in the developing world: lameness has been a continuous, but not exclusive, theme of her research in both of these species.  In both cases the problems she investigates affect large numbers of animals, for example an estimated 600,000 dairy cattle suffer with lameness at any one time in the UK and data suggest that nearly all of the estimated 90 million working equids in the developing world are lame, usually on all four limbs.  Her research has investigated the risk factors for, and welfare implications of problems such as lameness and she has gone on to develop and test intervention strategies to reduce these problems.   The development of methodologies to reduce problems such as lameness requires an interdisciplinary approach and has the potential to substantially impact the productivity and welfare of animals affected.  In 2015 she received the CEVA Farm Animal Welfare of the Year Award which recognised the impact that her work has had on improving the welfare of dairy cattle. In the case of working equids, the severity of lameness affecting an intervention study group reduced by 3 points on a 10 point scale, demonstrating that it is possible to improve the welfare of animals in impoverished communities.  Her use of systematic, scientific approaches to investigate and test solutions for animal welfare problems in the developing world has also had an impact on the way UK animal welfare charities address animal welfare problems and how they prioritize their work.

Activities / Findings

Current Projects Include:

Risk factors for lameness in working equids [in India & Pakistan]

Implementation of existing knowledge to reduce lameness in dairy cattle

Pain perception and analgesia in donkeys

Detection and treatment if digital dermatitis in UK dairy cattle

Rabies and reproduction control in roaming dogs in the developing world

A review of equine welfare in England & Wales

The welfare of vulnerable equines in South Wales

Attitudes of UK veterinary practitioners to pain relief in cats and dogs

The welfare of donated cattle and goats in rural African communities

Keywords

  • • Animal Welfare Assessment • Investigating risk factors for animal welfare problems • Developing methodologies for implementing animal welfare improvement • Animal and Human welfare in the developing world

Recent publications

View complete publications list in the University of Bristol publications system

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