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Publication - Dr Paul Clarke

    The Lost Palace

    Citation

    Clarke, P, 2016, ‘The Lost Palace’. Historic Royal Palaces

    Abstract

    ‘The Lost Palace’ launched in summer 2016, as a brand new visitor experience exploring the once magnificent Whitehall Palace. A reworked and developed version also ran throughout summer 2017. Beginning at Banqueting House, the only surviving building of what was once the largest palace in Europe, visitors took to the streets of modern day Whitehall. Bespoke handheld devices, binaural 3D sound and haptic technology guided them on a digital adventure to discover a hidden history. The Lost Palace is a pioneering project commissioned by Historic Royal Palaces, the independent charity that cares for Banqueting House and five other royal palaces. This visitor experience was produced by Historic Royal Palaces with Paul Clarke's theatre company, Uninvited Guests, in collaboration with sound designer Lewis Gibson and award winning designers Chomko & Rosier. Paul Clarke was the writer and director on the project. 
    For over two centuries, the palace sprawled over the area now known as Whitehall, encompassing 1,500 rooms spread over 23 acres and Banqueting House was the jewel in its crown. The Palace of Whitehall was the largest royal residence for the Tudor and Stuart courts. Some of the most significant, defining moments in British history took place here. Through the magic of binaural sound, The Lost Palace immersed families and adults in the world of the Tudor and Stuart courts. Visitors experienced some of the most exciting and intriguing moments from the palace's past. At Horse Guards Parade they could enjoy the jousts that so delighted Elizabeth I. They felt Charles I’s ragged heartbeat as he walked through St James’s Park on his final journey to Banqueting House for his execution. They listened-in on Guy Fawkes being interrogated after his arrest for the Gunpowder plot, before his transfer to the Tower of London for torture. Visitors also became players in the first performance of King Lear and eavesdropped on the fateful first encounter between Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, before their doomed love affair began, all while exploring the historic streets of London.

    Full details in the University publications repository