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Professor Antony Carrington

Biography

Professor Carrington was born in Solihull, England in 1968.  He began his university career by studying physics at the University of Warwick and graduated with a first class degree in 1990.  He then went on to study for a Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge, working on the (then) newly discovered high temperature cuprate superconductors.  This graduate work concentrated on studies of the normal state transport properties of these materials. He graduated with a Ph.D. in 1994, and moved to Grenoble where he held a position as a Marie-Curie fellow.  Here he continued to study cuprate superconductors, especially their transport properties and developed techniques to measure the specific heat of microgram size samples.  In 1996, he moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where took up a post-doctoral position in the group of Dr. Russ Giannetta.  Here he began development of a new way of measuring the magnetic penetration depth of superconductors based on a radio frequency resonant tunnel diode oscillator.  This was used to measure the field-dependence of the penetration depth in the cuprate superconductor YBCO, and was also adapted to make low temperature measurement of penetration depth in the 'ET' based two dimensional organic superconductors.
In 1998, he was appointed as a Lecturer at the University of Leeds. There built new apparatus to study magnetic penetration depth in exotic superconductors and in particular studied the influence of surface Andreev bound states on the surface currents.  In 2000, he moved to the University of Bristol: initially as a Lecturer, promoted to Reader in 2004 and then to a full Professor in 2008.  At Bristol, he has continued to work on the fundamental properties of superconductors, developing experiments to measure the superconducting properties (penetration depth, specific heat) and also the normal state electronic structure using the de Haas-van Alphen effect.

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