IAS Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor Mark H. Bornstein: Towards a Behavioural Neuroscience of Parenting

25 June 2015, 4.00 PM - 25 June 2015, 5.00 PM

IAS Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor Marc H. Bornstein

Oakfield House Seminar Room (OS6)

Human caregiving has probable evolutionary bases and may be constituted of highly conserved actions.  Behavioral and cultural study reveals some universal forms of parenting that guide us in formulating testable hypotheses about autonomic and central nervous system substrates of caregiving.  My talk follows that path.  I first discuss the nature, structure, and goals of parenting. Next, I review behavioral and cultural research designed to uncover commonly expressed approaches to parenting infants and young children.  I then turn to describe studies of the nervous system that relate to caregiving behaviors and begin to unveil deeply embedded ANS and CNS mechanisms that may underpin a neuroscience of parenting.  I conclude by pointing to some frontiers and future directions in this developing field.

MARC H. BORNSTEIN is Senior Investigator and Head of Child and Family Research at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  Bornstein has held faculty positions at Princeton University and New York University as well as academic appointments as Visiting Scientist in Munich, London, Paris, New York, Tokyo, Bamenda, Seoul, Trento, and Santiago.  Bornstein is President-elect of the SRCD, where he was a member of the Governing Council, and he sat on the Executive Committee of the International Society of Infancy Studies.  Bornstein was named to the Top 20 Authors for Productivity in Developmental Science by the American Educational Research Association. 

Bornstein is author/coauthor/editor/coeditor of numerous books and scientific articles in experimental, methodological, comparative, developmental, and cultural science as well as neuroscience, pediatrics, and aesthetics, and he is author of or consultant on children's books, videos, and puzzles in The Child's World and Baby Explorer series.  Bornstein has administered both Federal and Foundation grants, sits on the editorial boards of several professional journals, is a member of scholarly societies in a variety of disciplines, and consults for governments, foundations, universities, publishers, scientific journals, the media, and UNICEF.  Bornstein is Editor Emeritus of Child Development and founding Editor of Parenting: Science and Practice

Human caregiving has probable evolutionary bases and may be constituted of highly conserved actions.  Behavioral and cultural study reveals some universal forms of parenting that guide us in formulating testable hypotheses about autonomic and central nervous system substrates of caregiving.  My talk follows that path.  I first discuss the nature, structure, and goals of parenting. Next, I review behavioral and cultural research designed to uncover commonly expressed approaches to parenting infants and young children.  I then turn to describe studies of the nervous system that relate to caregiving behaviors and begin to unveil deeply embedded ANS and CNS mechanisms that may underpin a neuroscience of parenting.  I conclude by pointing to some frontiers and future directions in this developing field.

 

Contact information

IAS Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor Marc H. Bornstein

For further information about Dr Bornstein's visit, please contact Dr Rebecca Pearson at rebecca.pearson@bristol.ac.uk.