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Ms Sage Brice

Crane cultures: drawing multi-species wetland narratives from field and archive

Summary

Politics of nature, displacement and belonging; posthumanist landscape geographies, and the use of creative and experimental methods.

Biography

Sage Brice works across media and fields of professional practice, to elicit more inclusive and horizontal understandings of changeable landscapes. She studied Environmental art at the Glasgow School of art (BA hons with distinction, 2006), and Human geography at the University of Bristol (MSc 2015). She currently entwines a lively contemporary art practice with doctoral studies in Cultural geography at the University of Bristol.

Sage uses found materials and borrowed languages to elicit layered histories of place through drawing, sculpture, installation and performance. Her research interests encompass politics of nature, displacement and belonging, more-than-human animal and landscape geographies, and the use of creative and experimental methods. Her doctoral project is on the intersection of human and nonhuman animal cultures, as mobilised in the figure of the common crane (Grus grus) in the Huleh Valley. A critical stopover habitat for migrating birds on the largest intercontinental flyway between Eurasia and Africa (the Jordan Rift Valley), this site was substantially reduced through a centralised drainage scheme 1951, after the establishment of the state of Israel. The site became a valediction of state engineering and infrastructural modernism, ultimately leading to the incremental restoration of wetland habitats.

Recent exhibitions include The Power of the Sea at the Royal West of England Academy and The Water Knows All My Secrets at the Pratt Manhattan Gallery. She is now working with Seila Fernandez Arconada on Some:when, a socially-engaged project for the Somerset Moor and Levels, supported by a grant from the Somerset Community Foundation. Current academic affiliations include the Figure in the Landscape Research Cluster (SWWDTP), Beastly Histories (University of Bristol), and Between the Tides, an exchange between U. Glos and U. Gröningen.

Keywords

  • Interdisciplinary research
  • Creative research methods
  • Art
  • Drawing
  • Landscape studies
  • Nature-culture entanglements
  • Cultural Geography
  • Archival practices
  • Resilience
  • Flood risk

Research keywords

  • Interdisciplinary research
  • Creative research methods
  • Art
  • Performance
  • Landscape studies
  • Nature-culture entanglements
  • Cultural Geography
  • Archival practices
  • Resilience
  • Flood risk