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Publication - Professor Marcus Munafo

    Effect of glass markings on drinking rate in social alcohol drinkers

    Citation

    Troy, D, Attwood, A, Maynard, O, Scott-Samuel, N, Hickman, M, Marteau, T & Munafo, M, 2017, ‘Effect of glass markings on drinking rate in social alcohol drinkers’. European Journal of Public Health, vol 27., pp. 352-356

    Abstract

    Background: The main aim of these studies was to
    explore the influence of volume information on glassware on the time
    taken to consume an alcoholic beverage. Methods: In Study 1, male and female social alcohol consumers (n
    = 159) were randomised to drink 12 fl oz of either low or standard
    strength lager, from either a curved glass marked with yellow tape at
    the midpoint or an unmarked curved glass, in a between-subjects design.
    In Study 2, male and female social alcohol consumers (n = 160)
    were randomised to drink 12 fl oz of standard strength lager from either
    a curved glass marked with ¼, ½ and ¾ volume points or an unmarked
    curved glass, in a between-subjects design. The primary outcome measure
    for both studies was total drinking time of an alcoholic beverage. Results:
    In Study 1, after removing outliers, total drinking time was slower
    from the glass with midpoint volume marking [mean drinking times (min):
    9.98 (marked) vs. 9.55 (unmarked), mean difference = 0.42, 95% CI:
    −0.90, 1.44]. In Study 2, after removing outliers, total drinking time
    was slower from the glass with multiple volume marks [mean drinking
    times: 10.34 (marked) vs. 9.11 (unmarked), mean difference = 1.24, 95%
    CI: −0.11, 2.59]. However, in both studies confidence intervals were
    wide and also consistent with faster consumption from marked glasses. Conclusion:
    Consumption of an alcoholic beverage may be slower when served in
    glasses with volume information. Replication in larger studies is
    warranted.

    Full details in the University publications repository