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Publication - Professor David Dymock

    First experiences as a Best Evidence Medical Education reviewer- what’s it really like?

    Citation

    Williams, J, Cake, M, Borwick, C, Dymock, D, Fowler, E, Ireland, A, Warman, S & Baillie, S, 2016, ‘First experiences as a Best Evidence Medical Education reviewer- what’s it really like?’.

    Abstract

    First experiences as a Best Evidence Medical Education reviewer- what’s it really like?
    Julie Williams*, School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol
    Cath Borwick, Medical Libraries, University of Bristol
    David Dymock, Centre for Health Sciences Education, University of Bristol
    Ellayne Fowler, Centre for Health Sciences Education, University of Bristol
    Tony Ireland, School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol
    Sheena Warman, School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol
    Sarah Baillie, School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol

    Aim: BEME reviews are the highest-standard, peer-reviewed reports of evidence available relating to medical and health professions education (1). Undertaking a BEME review is academically stimulating and interesting but also highly challenging, even with the support of an experienced inter-professional team. This work describes some of those challenges and some handy tips to ease the novice (dental) reviewer through the early stages of a BEME review.

    Materials and methods: This presentation is informed by my first two experiences of BEME, firstly as a reviewer (2) and now as a Group Leader (3). The essential stages of creating a successful BEME protocol such as recruiting the right team, selecting a suitable question, defining the limitations of the search and creating inclusion and exclusion criteria will be described.

    Results: A number of tips that our team found helpful through the day-to-day, month by month development of a BEME review will be shared including a suggested list of questions to discuss at the first three review team meetings.

    Conclusions: Managing the BEME review process and the associated data requires considerable time and support from information scientists. Sharing good practice and areas for improvement from recent review experience is important to create efficient, effective review teams.

    Take home messages: Spending time with colleagues who have previous BEME review experience was crucial to the success of our review. Further discussion of the process in a ‘Free Stage’ setting would be helpful to both our current review and the valuable work of the BEME collaboration.

    References:
    1. The BEME Collaboration 2016. Available online at http://bemecollaboration.org. Accessed on [ 27 March 2016].
    2. Cake M, Bell M, Williams J.C., Brown F, Dozier M, Rhind S, Baillie S. 2016. Which professional (non-technical) competencies are most important to the success of graduate veterinarians? A Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) systematic review: BEME Guide No. 38. Med Teach (in press).
    3. Williams, J.C., Borwick, C., Dymock, D., Fowler, E, Ireland, A.J., Warman, S., Baillie, S. (2016) Protocol submitted Which is the most effective assessment tool to measure the ability to self-reflect and respond with insight within undergraduate health sciences curricula? A Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) Systematic Review.

    Full details in the University publications repository