Browse/search for people

Publication - Professor Marianne Thoresen

    Rectal temperature in the first five hours after hypoxia-ischaemia critically affects neuropathological outcomes in neonatal rats

    Citation

    Wood, TR, Hobbs, C, Falck, M, Brun, AC, Løberg, EM & Thoresen, M, 2017, ‘Rectal temperature in the first five hours after hypoxia-ischaemia critically affects neuropathological outcomes in neonatal rats’. Paediatric Research.

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Hyperthermia after hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) in newborn infants is associated with worse neurological outcomes. Loss of thermoregulation may also be associated with greater injury.

    METHODS: In the postnatal-day 7 (P7) rat, the effect of 5h of graded hyperthermia (38°C or 39°C) immediately after unilateral HI was compared to normothermia (NT, 37°C), and therapeutic hypothermia (TH, 32°C). Early (negative geotaxis) and late (staircase test) behavioural testing was performed, as well as neuropathology scoring in adulthood. Separately, P7 rats were exposed to HI, and individual nesting temperatures monitored before analysis of neuropathology at P14.

    RESULTS: Mortality increased as temperature was increased from 38°C (0%) to 39°C (50%) after HI. Hyperthermia also resulted in early behavioural deficits compared to NT animals. In adulthood, pathology scores in the thalamus, basal ganglia, cortex, and hippocampus increased as post-hypoxic temperature increased above NT. Significant global neuroprotection was seen in the TH group. However, no significant difference was seen between HI groups in the staircase test. One hour after HI, the core temperature of pups was inversely correlated with global pathology scores at P14.

    CONCLUSION: Early temperature is a significant determinant of injury after experimental HI. Spontaneous decreases in core temperature after HI may confound neuroprotection studies.Pediatric Research (2017); doi:10.1038/pr.2017.51.

    Full details in the University publications repository