Browse/search for people

Dr Richard Sessions

Dr Richard Sessions

Dr Richard Sessions
B.Sc., Ph.D.(Bristol)

Senior Research Fellow

Office C.62
Biomedical Sciences Building,
University Walk, Clifton BS8 1TD
(See a map)

+44 (0) 117 331 2146

Summary

Molecular Modelling in Biochemistry

Molecular modelling is a very useful tool in the design and interpretation of experiments. This is well recognised in Bristol, where most research groups have used this technique, to a greater or lesser extent.

Molecular modelling can also be thought of as a subset of Bioinformatics and, as we pass into the "post-genomic sequence era", this field will play an ever more important role in scientific research.

Computer hardware advances continue to follow Moore’s law, formulated in the 1960s, which states that machine speed’s roughly double every 18 months. This is allowing the application of evermore sophisticated modelling techniques to routine problems. The following molecular modelling techniques and projects are actively pursued in the School of Biochemistry:

  • homology modelling
  • ligand/drug design
  • mutant design
  • molecular mechanics/dynamics
  • semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations
  • protein structure prediction.

More information about my research.

More information about the Bristol University Docking Engine (BUDE).

Teaching

Biophysics and Molecular Life Sciences II

MSc Core Skills

Expertise

Molecular Modelling in Biochemistry. Molecular modelling is a very useful tool in the design and interpretation of experiments. This is well recognised in Bristol, where most research groups have used this technique, to a greater or lesser extent. Molecular modelling can also be thought of as a subset of Bioinformatics and, as we pass into the "post-genomic sequence era", this field will play an ever more important role in scientific research. Computer hardware advances continue to follow Moore?s law, formulated in the 1960?s, which states that machine speed?s roughly double every 18 months. This is allowing the application of evermore sophisticated modelling techniques to routine problems. The following molecular modelling techniques and projects are actively pursued in this department: homology modelling; ligand/drug design; mutant design; molecular mechanics/dynamics; semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations; protein structure prediction.

  • molecular modelling
  • bioinformatics
  • homology modelling
  • drug design
  • protein
  • protein structure prediction
  • Memberships

    Organisations

    School of Biochemistry

    Other sites

    Recent publications

    View complete publications list in the University of Bristol publications system

    Edit this profile If you are Dr Richard Sessions, you can edit this page. Login required.

    PDF versionDownload PDF