Skip to main content

Unit information: Nations and Nationalism in 2022/23

Please note: It is possible that the information shown for future academic years may change due to developments in the relevant academic field. Optional unit availability varies depending on both staffing, student choice and timetabling constraints.

Unit name Nations and Nationalism
Unit code SOCI30082
Credit points 20
Level of study H/6
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12)
Unit director Professor. Fox
Open unit status Not open
Units you must take before you take this one (pre-requisite units)

None

Units you must take alongside this one (co-requisite units)

None

Units you may not take alongside this one
School/department School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Unit Information

The content of the unit will focus on different scholarly perspectives on ethnicity, nationality, ethnic groups, and nations. The unit will be divided into three parts. We will begin by establishing an analytical framework for the study of ethnicity and nationalism that stresses the historic specificity and social construction of ethnic groups and nations. In the middle part of the unit, we will examine a range of ways in which ethnicity and nationality are experienced, legitimated, and reproduced in the modern world. The final part of the unit will be devoted to contemporary applications of these concepts: how ethnicity and nationalism manifest themselves in politics, culture, and everyday life. Combined, these three parts will establish different ways in which ethnicity and nationality are modern social constructs.

The unit aims to:

1. critically assess the social, political, economic, and cultural underpinnings of ethnicity and nationalism;

2. understand and appreciate ethnicity and nationalism as politically significant features of the modern era;

3. consider both the macro-structural and micro-interactional dynamics contributing to the construction and reproduction of ethnicity and nationality; and,

4. gauge the changing social significance of ethnicity and nationalism in historical perspective and in the contemporary world.

Your learning on this unit

On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

A. demonstrate a sociologically critical appreciation of ethnicity and nationalism as specifically modern social constructs;

B. appreciate the macro- and micro-dimensions of ethnicity and nationalism as well as the interplay between them; and,

C. apply the analytical concepts used in the unit across different historical and geographical cases.

How you will learn

The unit will be taught through blended learning methods, including a mix of synchronous and asynchronous teaching activities

How you will be assessed

3000 word essay (100%)

Resources

If this unit has a Resource List, you will normally find a link to it in the Blackboard area for the unit. Sometimes there will be a separate link for each weekly topic.

If you are unable to access a list through Blackboard, you can also find it via the Resource Lists homepage. Search for the list by the unit name or code (e.g. SOCI30082).

How much time the unit requires
Each credit equates to 10 hours of total student input. For example a 20 credit unit will take you 200 hours of study to complete. Your total learning time is made up of contact time, directed learning tasks, independent learning and assessment activity.

See the Faculty workload statement relating to this unit for more information.

Assessment
The Board of Examiners will consider all cases where students have failed or not completed the assessments required for credit. The Board considers each student's outcomes across all the units which contribute to each year's programme of study. If you have self-certificated your absence from an assessment, you will normally be required to complete it the next time it runs (this is usually in the next assessment period).
The Board of Examiners will take into account any extenuating circumstances and operates within the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes.

Feedback