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Unit information: Global Higher Education in 2021/22

Unit name Global Higher Education
Unit code EDUCD0003
Credit points 20
Level of study D/8
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 2 (weeks 13 - 24)
Unit director Dr. Lucas
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department School of Education
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Description including Unit Aims

This unit is concerned with Global Higher Education and will be based around theories of globalisation, internationalisation and regionalisation in understanding the development of higher education across different national contexts. The significance of global league tables and the huge increase in numbers of international students around the globe means that higher education in all countries is positioned within the global landscape and this has implications for national higher education policies and debates on the funding and governance processes of the higher education sector. The unit draws on a wide range of disciplinary literature within sociology, geography and cultural studies as well as the wider literature on higher education.

The unit will begin by charting the current landscape of policies and debates relating to higher education across different national contexts, including, Europe, Australasia, Asia and North America. It will be focused around three key themes; a) Global Perspectives on Higher Education, b) Governance of Higher Education at Global, Regional and National Levels, c) The Global University: institutional processes. Key debates around marketization and privatization as well as quality assurance and enhancement and internationalization and diversity will be explored throughout the three themes.

The unit will be of value to academics, higher education researcher, educational developers, higher education managers and administrators and those who wish to enter such occupations.

Unit Aims

  • To provide an understanding of the concepts of globalization and internationalization and how these inform the development of higher education in different national contexts.
  • To critically engage with the policy debates and theoretical ideas underpinning the governance of higher education at a global, regional and national level.
  • To better understand the institutional processes of the university and how these are influenced by the idea of a ‘global university’.
  • To enable participates to share experiences and apply debates to their own context, practice and research interests

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students will be able;

  • to demonstrate knowledge of and critically evaluate and compare the theoretical ideas and concepts relating to globalization, internationalization and how these inform changing higher education systems;
  • to critically engage with the policy debates and ideas underpinning the governance of higher education at a global, regional and national level;
  • to develop skills to critically analyse and better understand the institutional processes of the university and how these are influenced by the idea of a ‘global university’;
  • to consider the key themes of the unit and how these might apply to their own context, practice and research interests.

Teaching Information

This unit invovles tutor presentations with interactive discussion, group activities and student-led discussions and presentations.

Assessment Information

A 4,000 word assignment which will assess students' critical understanding of the literature on a selected topic within the unit, and their ability to discuss the implications of the theories and concepts in relation to their own professional practice and /or through a small-scale empirical study.

Formative assessment will also be provided in the form of detailed feedback on drafts and discussion of student presentations.

Resources

If this unit has a Resource List, you will normally find a link to it in the Blackboard area for the unit. Sometimes there will be a separate link for each weekly topic.

If you are unable to access a list through Blackboard, you can also find it via the Resource Lists homepage. Search for the list by the unit name or code (e.g. EDUCD0003).

How much time the unit requires
Each credit equates to 10 hours of total student input. For example a 20 credit unit will take you 200 hours of study to complete. Your total learning time is made up of contact time, directed learning tasks, independent learning and assessment activity.

See the Faculty workload statement relating to this unit for more information.

Assessment
The Board of Examiners will consider all cases where students have failed or not completed the assessments required for credit. The Board considers each student's outcomes across all the units which contribute to each year's programme of study. If you have self-certificated your absence from an assessment, you will normally be required to complete it the next time it runs (this is usually in the next assessment period).
The Board of Examiners will take into account any extenuating circumstances and operates within the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes.

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