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Unit information: Introduction to Hebrew 1 in 2015/16

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Unit name Introduction to Hebrew 1
Unit code THRS30169
Credit points 20
Level of study H/6
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12)
Unit director Dr. Campbell
Open unit status Open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department Department of Religion and Theology
Faculty Faculty of Arts

Description

This unit aims to introduce the basic elements of the alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar of Biblical Hebrew, as well as brief consideration of the origins and nature of the biblical text. The Unit centres almost exclusively on one book (C.L. Seow, A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew, revised edition, 1995) which presents the subject in an accurate and interesting way. The Hebrew Scriptures or Old Testament were originally written almost entirely in Hebrew. Whilst there are reliable English translations in existence, to be able to read the Hebrew Scriptures in the original—or even just to be able to read them in translation with some knowledge of Hebrew—has obvious advantages. Chief among these is an appreciation for the nuances, interconnections, and poetry of the texts themselves, all of which can be considerably diminished in translation.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this unit student will have an introductory knowledge and understanding of the basic elements of the alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar of Biblical Hebrew, as well as of the origins and nature of the biblical text.

Teaching details

1 x 2 hour seminar shared with equivalent units at levels 4 and 5.

Assessment Details

This unit will be assessed summatively by 2 x 1 hour summative class tests, each worth 50% of the final mark, testing understanding of the basic elements of the alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar of Biblical Hebrew.

Reading and References

J. Campbell, Deciphering the Dead Sea Scrolls (Oxford: Blackwell, 2002); R.J. Coggins, Introducing the Old Testament (2nd edition; Oxford: OUP, 2000); K. Doob Sakenfeld (ed), New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (2nd edition; volumes 1-5; Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2006-9); C.L. Seow, A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew (revised edition;Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1995)

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