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Unit information: Human Disease in 2015/16

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Unit name Human Disease
Unit code ORDS30008
Credit points 20
Level of study H/6
Teaching block(s) Academic Year (weeks 1 - 52)
Unit director Professor. Steve Thomas
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department Bristol Dental School
Faculty Faculty of Health Sciences

Description

The Teaching Unit takes place in Year 3 and comprises 3 Elements:

  1. Medicine
  2. Surgery
  3. Clinical Pathology and Microbiology

The Unit of Human Disease provides didactic and clinical teaching throughout year 3 of the BDS Programme in Clinical Medical Sciences and the majority of the teaching in this Unit is carried out by medical staff from the Bristol Royal Infirmary. Knowledge of the Clinical Medical Sciences forms the medical basis of the provision of dental care. The course is intended to provide students with sufficient knowledge to recognise problems in the medical history of patients about to undergo dental treatment and to take the appropriate action to provide high quality care. An important aspect of the Unit is to ensure that graduate practitioners understand when referral for complex treatment is indicated. It is also to enable dental students to understand their role in the wider Health Care context.

The general AIM of this Unit is as follows:

To integrate teaching and experience in General Medicine, General Surgery, Clinical Microbiology and Clinical Pathology to provide students with an understanding of the principles of these subjects as a prerequisite to the ‘whole patient care’ and health promotion approach of modern dentistry.

The general OBJECTIVES are:

  • To understand the principle of obtaining a full history from a patient with a medical disorder presenting in any environment.
  • To outline the tests used to diagnose medical conditions and the different types of treatment available (including drugs, angioplasty and open-heart surgery).
  • To highlight dentally relevant aspects of these conditions.
  • Carry out initial assessment and management of emergencies.
  • Be able to respond appropriately to emergency situations that might occur in dental practice.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the basic medical sciences underlying general medical and surgical practice (2nd and 3rd BDS material).
  • Describe in a structured manner the clinical presentation of disease.

Intended learning outcomes

A. Clinically related skills

On completing the course, successful students should be able to:

Recognise the signs and symptoms of the following conditions and to give the signs which may be discernible in a clothed dental patient with: hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, rheumatic fever, bacterial endocarditis, aortic and mitral valve disease, heart failure, congenital heart defects, respiratory failure, asthma, bronchiectasis, pneumonia, tuberculosis, carcinoma of the lung, sarcoidosis, pulmonary embolism, oesophagitis, carcinoma of the oesophagus, carcinoma of the stomach, peptic/duodenal ulcers, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, acute hepatitis, cirrhosis, epilepsy, meningitis, cerebrovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, renal disorders, peripheral neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, sero-negative arthritis, cardiorespiratory arrest, acute anaphylaxis, unconsciousness, acute asthmatic attack, diabetes mellitus, disorders of the pituitary, adrenal and thyroid glands, anaemia, bleeding disorders, leukaemias, lymphoma, skin infections, sexually transmitted diseases, drug induced diseases and addiction, ENT diseases and eye disorders

  • Be able to recognise the signs relevant to the above conditions that may be discernible in a clothed dental patient.
  • Carry out initial assessment and management of emergencies
  • Elicit a medical history from a patient in a manner appropriate to the patient’s medical or surgical needs.
  • Be able to respond appropriately to emergency situations that might occur in dental practice relating to the above conditions, with particular emphasis on management of anaphylactic shock.
  • Perform simple first-aid treatment
  • Diagnose and suggest appropriate care for patients suffering from head and/or spinal injuries

B. Cognitive Skills

On completing the course, successful students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the basic medical sciences underlying general medical and surgical practice (2nd and 3rd BDS material)
  • Describe methods for maintaining personal health including nutrition and exercise
  • Be familiar with the general management of trauma cases, including the management of bone fractures
  • Describe the principles governing the management of malignancy in general (e.g., related to breast carcinoma) and specifically related to carcinoma of tissues in the head and neck
  • Describe the principles of vascular surgery
  • Describe the principles of gastrointestinal surgery
  • Discuss the principles of, and problems associated with, transplant surgery
  • Describe the general principles of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including repair of cleft- palate

C. Transferable skills

On completing the course, successful students should be able to:

  • Obtain a pertinent medical history from patients
  • Describe in a structured manner the clinical presentation of disease
  • Write a structured essay
  • Apply lateral thinking to diagnostic skills
  • Elicit a medical history from a patient in a manner appropriate to the patient's medical or surgical needs
  • Carry out a differential diagnosis of swellings of the head and neck
  • Diagnose and suggest appropriate care for patients suffering from shock and/or haemorrhage

Teaching details

54 x 1 hour lectures.

6 clinical demonstrations.

Two week Clinical Attachment - (Block Release) one week each to a Medicine and Surgery Firm.

Year group divided between BRI, Southmead and Weston Hospitals.

Rotation to Medical Admissions Unit.

Assessment Details

The exams assess three subject areas comprising of:

1. Medicine

2. Surgery

3. Clinical Pathology/Microbiology.

  • 1 hour e-Assessment and 2 hour, 10 Written short answer questions, covering all subject areas (Medicine, Surgery and Clinical Pathology and Microbiology)(50% of the total Unit mark)
  • 2 Clinical OSCE stations (50% of the total Unit mark)

The e-Assessment and the MSA combine to create the ‘Written’ component of the assessments.

The ‘OSCE’ and the ‘Written’ assessments are considered separate must pass to progress components.

Both components (the OSCE and the Written) need to be passed separately with a minimum of 50% pass mark in each.

The written assessments and the OSCE assessment are considered separate components of the overall Human Disease mark. These components are not cross compensated.

The Written component (e-Assessment and the MSA) are of equal weighting and are cross compensated.

Reading and References

  • Kumar P, Clark M. Kumar and Clark’s clinical medicine. 8th ed. Saunders; 2012. ISBN:978070204491.
  • Walker BR, Colledge NR, Ralston SH, Penman I, editors. Davidson’s principles and practice of medicine. 22nd ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2014. ISBN:9780702050350.
  • Davey P, editor. Medicine at a glance. 3rd ed. Wiley Blackwell; 2010. ISBN: 140518616X or ISBN:9781405186162.
  • Grace PA, Borley NR. Surgery at a glance. 4th ed. Wiley Blackwell, 2009. ISBN:9781405183253 or ISBN:140518325X or ISBN:9781405186162.
  • Longmore M, Wilkinson I, Davidson E, Foulkes A, Mafi A . Oxford handbook of clinical medicine. 8th ed. Oxford University Press. 2010. ISBN:9780199232178 or ISBN: 0199232172
  • Samaranayake L. Essential microbiology for dentistry.3rd ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2006. ISBN:9780443100796 or ISBN:0443100799

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