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Unit information: Optoelectronic Devices and Systems (M) in 2021/22

Unit name Optoelectronic Devices and Systems (M)
Unit code EENGM6020
Credit points 10
Level of study M/7
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12)
Unit director Professor. Cryan
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

Entry to MSc

Co-requisites

None

School/department Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
Faculty Faculty of Engineering

Description including Unit Aims

This module introduces the main components of modern day optoelectronic systems. This will include active devices for the generation, detection, amplification and modulation of optical signals and the key passive components in modern optical communication systems.

Elements

Optoelectronic Devices- Passive Components Dr M.J. Cryan

Waveguides: Introduction to passive waveguides and their modes. Explain the single mode optical fibre, losses and dispersion. Directional couplers, Bragg reflectors and filters.

Active Components Dr Edmund Harbord

Sources: introduction to electron-photon interactions in semiconductors. Explain the operation of the light emitting diode (LED). Explain the conditions required for laser action and distinguish the characteristics of laser emission from LED emission. Describe the current/voltage, power/current and frequency characteristics of light-emitting and laser diodes. Describe the Fabry-Perot and distributed-feedback and distributed-Bragg-reflector laser diodes, and explain the factors that determine their line-widths.

Detectors: explain the principles of optical detectors including PIN photodiodes and avalanche detectors. Discuss the ideal, quantum-noise limited receiver obeying Poisson statistics and relate number of detected photons to bit-error-ratio. Explain why the sensitivity of the best receivers falls short of the ideal.

Amplifiers and modulators: Introduce the optical amplifiers and optical modulators. Give examples of fibre amplifiers and semiconductor laser amplifiers. Introduce electro-optic and electro-absorption modulators. Indicate their different applications in optical fibre communication systems.

Systems: explain how the elements introduced above fit into a modern day optical communications system.

Intended Learning Outcomes

Having completed this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Explain single mode optical fibre, losses and dispersion, directional couplers, Bragg reflectors and filters.
  2. Explain the operation of the light emitting diode (LED).
  3. Explain the conditions required for laser action and distinguish the characteristics of laser emission from LED emission.
  4. Describe the current/voltage, power/current and frequency characteristics of light-emitting and laser diodes.
  5. Describe the Fabry-Perot and distributed-feedback and distributed-Bragg-reflector laser diodes, and explain the factors that determine their line-widths.
  6. Explain the principles of optical detectors including PIN photodiodes and avalanche detectors.
  7. Discuss the ideal, quantum-noise limited receiver obeying Poisson statistics and relate number of detected photons to bit-error-ratio.
  8. Explain why the sensitivity of the best receivers falls short of the ideal.
  9. Give examples of fibre amplifiers and semiconductor laser amplifiers.
  10. Indicate the different applications of electro-optic and electro-absorption modulators in optical fibre communication systems.
  11. Explain how the elements introduced above fit into a modern day optical communications system.
  12. Use simulation to examine the behaviour of optical systems.

Teaching Information

Teaching will be delivered through a combination of synchronous and asynchronous sessions, including lectures, practical activities supported by drop-in sessions, problem sheets and self-directed exercises.

Assessment Information

Exam (January, 100%)

Resources

If this unit has a Resource List, you will normally find a link to it in the Blackboard area for the unit. Sometimes there will be a separate link for each weekly topic.

If you are unable to access a list through Blackboard, you can also find it via the Resource Lists homepage. Search for the list by the unit name or code (e.g. EENGM6020).

How much time the unit requires
Each credit equates to 10 hours of total student input. For example a 20 credit unit will take you 200 hours of study to complete. Your total learning time is made up of contact time, directed learning tasks, independent learning and assessment activity.

See the Faculty workload statement relating to this unit for more information.

Assessment
The Board of Examiners will consider all cases where students have failed or not completed the assessments required for credit. The Board considers each student's outcomes across all the units which contribute to each year's programme of study. If you have self-certificated your absence from an assessment, you will normally be required to complete it the next time it runs (this is usually in the next assessment period).
The Board of Examiners will take into account any extenuating circumstances and operates within the Regulations and Code of Practice for Taught Programmes.

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