News in 2020

  • Bristol and Women’s Aid develop best practice framework for domestic violence research 15 December 2020 A new framework has been developed by Women’s Aid in partnership with academic colleagues - including the University of Bristol - to promote best practice in research into domestic violence and abuse (DVA).
  • Preschoolers’ eating, activity and sleep behaviours were impacted during first COVID-19 lockdown, study suggests 14 December 2020 Preschool children’s eating, activity, and sleep routines were disrupted during the spring COVID-19 lockdown, which may be detrimental to child health and development a study suggests. Parents of children (aged three- to five-year-old) due to start school in September 2020 shared their children’s experiences of the spring lockdown with academics from the Universities of Bristol, Birmingham and Glasgow.
  • Testing memory over four weeks could predict Alzheimer's disease risk 11 December 2020 New research suggests testing people's memory over four weeks could identify who is at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease before it has developed. Importantly, the trial found testing people's ability to retain memories for longer time periods could predict this more accurately than classic memory tests, which test memory over half an hour.
  • Increased risk of domestic violence over Christmas 10 December 2020 Domestic violence and health experts from the University of Bristol are urging men in Bristol, South Gloucestershire, North Somerset, Somerset, Wiltshire and Gwent (South Wales) to get in touch if they are worried about being abusive or controlling in their relationships with women.
  • ‘Optimistic’ and ‘pessimistic’ decision-making as an indicator of animal emotion and welfare 8 December 2020 On 8 December 2020 Bristol Neuroscience was delighted to welcome Prof Mike Mendl and Dr Vikki Neville of Bristol Veterinary School who gave an excellent overview of the research they have been conducting on animal behaviour.
  • New study to investigate COVID-19 and misinformation 7 December 2020 Researchers at the University of Bristol and King's College London are leading a major new study to investigate COVID-19 perceptions and misperceptions, lockdown compliance and vaccine hesitancy.
  • Scientists develop an evolutionary theory of stress 7 December 2020 Scientists have created an evolutionary model to predict how animals should react in stressful situations.
  • Primary care and the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol dependence: what might work? 4 December 2020 Specialist alcohol treatment services cannot cope with the growing problem of alcohol use disorder. Even before the recent COVID-19 lockdown, it was estimated that more than 80% of those in need of treatment were not receiving it.
  • PReCePT: Prevention of Cerebral Palsy in PreTerm Labour shortlisted for the 2020 HSJ Awards 1 December 2020 On 18 November 2020 it was announced that PReCePT, a quality improvement (QI) programme led by clinicians at University Hospitals Bristol & Weston NHS Foundation Trust (UHBW) and at the West of England Academic Health Science Network (AHSN), has been shortlisted for Workforce Initiative of the Year at the 2020 Health Service Journal Awards.
  • Bristol Neuroscience Grey Walter Prize for best journal publication by a PhD student winner announced 1 December 2020 Neuroscience research at Bristol has made an impact around the world, from synaptic and circuit function to robotics, and Bristol Neuroscience recognises the contribution of Early Career Researchers to the field by running a competition named in honour of William Grey Walter who conducted basic and applied neurophysiological research at the Burden Neurological Institute in Bristol.
  • Exceptional challenges of bereavement during the pandemic highlighted in interim findings 1 December 2020 Interim findings of a survey of people bereaved in the UK since March, led by researchers from the univerities of Bristol and Cardiff and the Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre, show the difficulties and distress experienced by those who have lost a loved one, both prior to the death and in their grief.
  • Treatment for drug addiction - how do patients cope in lockdown? 28 November 2020 There are encouraging signs that people in treatment for drug addiction can manage their medication when they are entrusted with a substantial quantity of opiate substitutes and told to take it in small daily doses, finds a new ‘early insight’ report from researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Bath.
  • Exceptional Bristol researcher awarded Turing AI Fellowship to deliver world-class AI research 27 November 2020 Bristol researcher Dr Raul Santos-Rodriguez is one of 15 UK researchers awarded prestigious Turing AI fellowships to develop cutting-edge Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies.
  • Spread Germ Defence, not the virus! 25 November 2020 With Covid-19 infections still high and people preparing for Christmas gatherings, it is vitally important to try to reduce the spread of infection in people's homes as this is where infections are now most likely to be transmitted. Research suggests people who follow the advice from Germ Defence are less likely to catch flu or other viruses and less likely to pass it on to members of their household.
  • Young people's anxiety levels doubled during first COVID-19 lockdown, says study 24 November 2020 The number of young people with anxiety doubled from 13 per cent to 24 per cent, during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown 1, according to new research from the University of Bristol. The study, using Bristol’s Children of the 90s questionnaire data, showed that young people (27-29 years) reported higher levels of anxiety during the early phases of the pandemic in the first national lockdown and this was higher than their parents.
  • Seventeen Bristol academics named in Highly Cited Researchers 2020 list 23 November 2020 The Highly Cited Researchers 2020 list recognises 17 University of Bristol researchers reaching the highest sphere of influence in research.
  • Combined intimate partner violence that includes sexual violence is common and more damaging 16 November 2020 Women who experience sexual violence combined with other forms of intimate partner violence suffer greater damage to their health and are much more likely to attempt suicide, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care published today [12 November] in the International Journal of Epidemiology.
  • Investigating the impact of COVID-19 on anxiety and cognitive function in older adolescents 10 November 2020 On 10 November 2020 the Bristol Neuroscience Research Network hosted a webinar delivered by Meg Attwood, a second year PhD student based in the School of Psychological Science at the University of Bristol.
  • Urban gulls adapt foraging schedule to human activity patterns 10 November 2020 Fitting birds with GPS trackers inside mini backpacks reveals what has been long suspected: urban gulls know exactly when and where to forage for human food.
  • Launch of new neurodevelopmental and neurodiversity network 4 November 2020 A new regional network between the GW4 universities of Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter has launched which will focus on research into neurodiversity and conditions such as ADHD and autism. It will draw on world-leading expertise across GW4, including the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at Bristol, the Wales Autism Research Centre at Cardiff, and Egenis research groups at Exeter. While supported by GW4 – a research alliance bringing together the four universities - the network hopes to generate engagement from other researchers, clinicians, the public, and third sector organisations from around the region.
  • University of Bristol joins UK-wide calls for government to support post-Covid recovery plans 2 November 2020 The University of Bristol is among a UK-wide cohort of cities and their universities that is calling on the government to work towards a radical new vision to help bring social and economic prosperity post-Covid.
  • Research to use artificial intelligence to identify sick livestock 2 November 2020 The welfare of livestock could be improved thanks to a new research project that will use novel artificial intelligence methods combined with behavioural analytics to provide rapid and reliable insights to animal health for farmers across the UK. The research and commercial feasibility program, co-funded by Innovate UK, the UK's innovation agency, will be led by the Quant Foundry (QF) in collaboration with the University of Bristol Vet School and Agri-EPI Centre.
  • Multidisciplinary Bristol team receives £3m to investigate trustworthiness of future robots 29 October 2020 Would you trust a robot surgeon? What about a robot pilot, shop assistant or emergency responder? Would you trust them if they had the ability to adapt and change how they functioned? What would it take to make them trustworthy? These are some of the questions driving a team of social scientists, ethicists, computer scientists and engineers at the University of Bristol.
  • Neurological consequences of COVID-19 20 October 2020 On 20 October 2020 Drs Harriet Ball, Liz Coulthard, Tom Minton and Claire Rice presented a webinar, hosted by Bristol Neuroscience, on the Neurological consequences of COVID-19.
  • Bristol Cyber Security experts helping stop child exploitation 19 October 2020 Cyber Security experts at the University of Bristol are developing new technology to help law enforcement investigate child sexual abuse on the internet. The project will use AI to identify images, helping police to catch perpetrators and protect children.
  • Handbook helps explain how best to combat misinformation 19 October 2020 With the current flood of misinformation and "fake news" undermining democracies around the world, a consensus document that summarises the science of debunking has been published by a team of 22 prominent researchers of misinformation and its debunking.
  • Bristol researchers awarded Future Leaders Fellowships 15 October 2020 Four Bristol researchers have been awarded UK Research and Innovation's (UKRI) prestigious Future Leaders Fellowships. The awards, designed to establish the careers of world-class research and innovation leaders across the UK to help them tackle major global challenges, are announced today [15 October] by Science Minister Amanda Solloway.
  • New multi-million-pound centre to protect citizens online 14 October 2020 The University of Bristol will lead a team of the UK’s world-leading cyber security experts in the creation of a new, £8.6 million centre to protect citizens online.
  • Cameras that can learn 14 October 2020 Intelligent cameras could be one step closer thanks to a research collaboration between the Universities of Bristol and Manchester who have developed cameras that can learn and understand what they are seeing.
  • Researchers launch first study into COVID bereavement among BAME people 13 October 2020 A pioneering study into people's experience of bereavement during the COVID-19 pandemic has been launched by researchers from the universities of Cardiff and Bristol. The study is calling for participants, particularly those from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds following the disproportionate effect COVID-19 has had on ethnic minority groups.
  • Bristol's Professor Yardley awarded OBE for services to Covid-19 response 12 October 2020 University of Bristol professor, Lucy Yardley, has been awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2020 for her services to the Covid-19 response.
  • New emergency care research hub for Bristol launched 12 October 2020 The University of Bristol and UWE Bristol have joined forces with health care partners in the city to set up a collaborative research hub to improve the delivery of emergency care in Bristol and the surrounding area. The new hub, Research in Emergency Care, Avon Collaborative Hub (REACH), was launched today [Friday 9 October].
  • Bristol's computer vision experts working with BT to enhance experience of live events 9 October 2020 Computer vision experts from the University of Bristol are part of a new consortium, led by BT, driving the technology that will revolutionise the way we consume live events, from sports such as MotoGP and boxing, to dance classes.
  • Battling with neighbours could make animals smarter 7 October 2020 From ants to primates, ‘Napoleonic’ intelligence has evolved to help animals contend with the myriad cognitive challenges arising from interactions with rival outsiders, suggest researchers at the University of Bristol in a paper published in Nature Communications today [Tuesday 6 October].
  • Risk of self-harm increases for boys and girls who experience earlier puberty 6 October 2020 Boys and girls who experience puberty earlier than their peers have an increased risk of self-harm in adolescence, a study funded by the National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Centre (NIHR Bristol BRC) and published in the journal Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences today [Tuesday 6 October] has found.
  • Bristol’s ‘Science of Happiness’ course re-packaged as a BBC podcast 2 October 2020 A new BBC podcast will bring the University of Bristol’s ground-breaking Science of Happiness course to a much wider audience.
  • Presynaptic plasticity in hippocampal circuits 2 October 2020 Bristol Neuroscience was delighted to welcome Prof Christophe Mulle, Director of Research, School of Neurosciences at the University of Bordeaux as invited speaker for a webinar aired on 1 October 2020.
  • Bristol Neuroscience 4-year PhD studentship in Alzheimer’s Disease research 25 September 2020 Dr. D.J. Stewart (BA Philosophy and Psychology, 1954) has made an extremely generous donation to Bristol Neuroscience (BN), enabling funding of a BN 4-year PhD studentship in Alzheimer’s Disease research. The project is also supported by the Faculty of Life Sciences. The studentship is also supported by the Faculty of Life Sciences.
  • Do rats like to be tickled? 21 September 2020 Not all rats like to be tickled but by listening to their vocalisations it is possible to understand in real-time their individual emotional response, according to new research by the University of Bristol. The study, published today [21 September] in Current Biology, suggests that if this same relationship is observed for other situations, then it may be possible to use call patterns in rats to measure their emotional response and understand how best to improve their welfare.
  • Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds 18 September 2020 Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown. The study carried out by researchers from FAI Farms, the University of Bristol and The Norwegian University of Life Sciences, is published today [16 September], in Scientific Reports.
Pages: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4 > >>
Edit this page