News in 2019

  • Study shortlisted for Research Project of the Year award 23 December 2019 A research project focused uniquely on the missing voices and experiences of Syrian refugee fathers and the integration of their families has been recognised by the Times Higher Education (THE) Awards 2019.
  • Pilot study helps reduce use of opioid painkillers in patients with long-term pain 19 December 2019 A pioneering pilot service set up in South Gloucestershire to review patients’ use of prescription opioid painkillers for long-term pain has helped many users reduce their use and improve their quality of life, researchers at the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Evaluation of Interventions and NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West have found.
  • Focus on teenage anxiety may help early identification of those at risk of eating disorders 18 December 2019 Teenage girls who experience clinical levels of anxiety could be at greater risk of eating disorders, according to associations identified in a study completed by researchers at the University of Bristol with UCL.
  • UK universities will work together to improve research quality and reproducibility 10 December 2019 UK universities will collaborate to improve the quality of UK academic research output. Whilst the UK is at the leading edge of research globally, there is a need to constantly strive to improve in order to retain that positions. Crucially, institutions must produce research that is rigorous, robust and of high-quality, to ensure that the UK retains its reputation for producing world-leading research.
  • Sleep helps memory, right? Not for eyewitnesses 4 December 2019 New research investigating the effect of sleep on eyewitness memory has found that having a period of sleep, compared to a period of wake, does not improve eyewitness identification accuracy.
  • World first as artificial neurons developed to cure chronic diseases 3 December 2019 Artificial neurons on silicon chips that behave just like the real thing have been invented by scientists – a first-of-its-kind achievement with enormous scope for medical devices to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure, Alzheimer's, and other diseases of neuronal degeneration.
  • Progressing young people’s mental health research 28 November 2019 Research is urgently needed to understand the reasons for recent trends in young people’s wellbeing and to put in place effective prevention and support. On 28 November members of the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute Mental Health in Young People research initiative met for a workshop to hear about innovative research at Bristol, to strengthen connections and collaboration, and to identify future research needs in this area.
  • Children of abused mothers 50 per cent more likely to have low IQ 27 November 2019 Children of women who reported domestic violence in pregnancy or during the first six years of the child's life are almost 50 per cent more likely to have a low IQ at age eight, research has found.
  • Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients due to increase in overdose death 26 November 2019 Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients who are being treated with methadone or buprenorphine, also known as opioid agonist treatment (OAT), due to a three-fold increase in risk of overdose death, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol.
  • Women who spend their childhoods in deprived neighbourhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence 21 November 2019 Women who spend longer periods of their early lives in less affluent neighbourhoods are at greater risk of experiencing violence during their early adulthoods at the hands of their intimate partners, finds a new study published in Epidemiology.
  • Study looked for links between teenage anxiety and later harmful drinking 11 November 2019 Researchers at the University of Bristol have found evidence of an association between generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 and harmful drinking three years later, thanks to the long-term health study Children of the 90s.
  • Banks and other financial services urged to help reduce gambling-related harm 7 November 2019 During Responsible Gambling Week [7 to 13 November], financial services organisations are being called upon to take part in a new programme which looks at how best to help people who are struggling with gambling problems.
  • Yoga for Mental Health- a Neuroscience Perspective 6 November 2019 The ancient practice of yoga has expanded to all corners of today’s world. Recently it has gained popularity in the West, with the number of Americans practising yoga rising by 50%, from 22 to 35 million adults, between 2012 to 2017.
  • Artificial skin creates first ticklish devices 24 October 2019 A new interface developed by researchers in Bristol and Paris takes touch technology to the next level by providing an artificial skin-like membrane for augmenting interactive devices such as phones, wearables or computers.
  • £18.5 million boost for South West biosciences 24 October 2019 PhD training across the biosciences has received a massive boost thanks to a £18.5 million funding award from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC, part of UK Research and Innovation) to the University of Bristol-led South West Biosciences Doctoral Training Partnership (SWBio DTP).
  • Working at Mental Health and Wellbeing 22 October 2019 On 21 October 2019 Dame Carol Black, Government Adviser on Health, Wellbeing and Work, presented the 6th annual Elizabeth Blackwell public lecture.
  • New haptic arm places robotics within easy reach 20 October 2019 Imagine being able to build and use a robotic device without the need for expensive, specialist kit or skills. That is the vision that researchers from the University of Bristol have turned into reality, creating a lightweight, affordable and simple solution for everyday users.
  • Smart Internet Lab and Brigstow Institute collaborate to enable holographic persona at the Simple Things Festival 17 October 2019 A unique collaboration by the University of Bristol’s Smart Internet Lab and Brigstow Institute and the Simple Things Festival 2019 will allow festival ticket holders to experience a world premiere artistic performance in a multi-user Virtual Reality (VR) experience.
  • Report to understand our political nature 17 October 2019 Professor Stephan Lewandowsky and fifty-nine other experts from across the globe who work in the fields of behavioural and social sciences as well as the humanities, have contributed to the research that underpins the European Union's Joint Research Centre (JRC) report that calls upon evidence-informed policy making not to be taken for granted. The report itself brings new insights into our political behaviour and this understanding has the potential to address some of the current crises in our democracies.
  • £10 million funding boost for postgraduate biomedical sciences research 14 October 2019 The Wellcome Trust has awarded the University of Bristol over £10 million in funding for two prestigious PhD programmes in the faculties of Health Sciences and Life Sciences.
  • Scientists join forces to shed new light on ageing and wound healing 11 October 2019 Researchers from the Universities of Manchester and Bristol have been granted £4 million to investigate how cells govern the processes of ageing and wound healing and how this is influenced by the circadian (day/night) cycle. Their findings could help to improve wound healing and identify strategies to treat diseases like osteoarthritis.
  • Study aims to address suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries 10 October 2019 Future treatment and prevention of suicidal behaviour in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) should involve a wider range of approaches beyond just the treatment of psychiatric illness, according to a new University of Bristol study published on World Mental Health Day today [Thursday 10 October] in PLOS Medicine.
  • People eat more when dining with friends and family, study shows 4 October 2019 People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone – a possible throwback to our early ancestors’ approach to survival, according to a new study.
  • £420K funding boost for Bristol dementia research 1 October 2019 A University of Bristol researcher has been awarded nearly £420,000 by Alzheimer's Research UK to investigate specific changes to blood flow in the brain in Alzheimer's disease.
  • New research to improve mental health in young people 26 September 2019 We are delighted to announce four new research projects looking at different aspects of mental health in young people at the University of Bristol. The projects have been funded by the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute as part of the Mental Health in Young People research initiative, which is looking at ways to improve mental health and wellbeing for young people, with a particular focus on University students.
  • Kicking the gambling habit: what can banks and other financial services do to help? 24 September 2019 With around one million people in the UK suffering the negative consequences of gambling, some banks have introduced spending controls or ‘gambling blocks’ to help their customers. But do these measures work and what more can be done?
  • Inspired from nature – robots can now learn to swarm on the go 18 September 2019 A new generation of swarming robots which can independently learn and evolve new behaviours in the wild is one step closer, thanks to research from the University of Bristol and the University of the West of England (UWE).
  • International recognition for mental health researcher 18 September 2019 A researcher from the University of Bristol Medical School has received a prestigious international award in recognition of her outstanding research into suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries.
  • Childhood behaviour linked to taking paracetamol during pregnancy 16 September 2019 A new study by the University of Bristol adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol during pregnancy.
  • Bristol immersive VR documentary to be shown at Venice Film Festival 13 September 2019 From Bristol to the big screens of Venice Film Festival, Virtual Reality film The Waiting Room, [commissioned by the Virtual Realities – Immersive Documentary Encounters research project] will be premiered at the annual event which starts today [28 August to 7 September] to a star-studded audience of cinema enthusiasts.
  • £1.8 million for trial to evaluate treatment for chronic severe low back pain 12 September 2019 Researchers at the University of Bristol, in collaboration with North Bristol NHS Trust, the Universities of Keele and Southampton have been awarded £1.8 million from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) to evaluate a treatment for chronic severe low back pain. Led by Dr Vikki Wylde, the RADICAL study will be a randomised controlled trial to find out if radiofrequency denervation, a procedure commonly used in the NHS, can provide pain relief.
  • UK military families struggle to access specialist domestic abuse support 11 September 2019 Less than 10 per cent of domestic violence and abuse (DVA) services identify themselves as providing specialist support to military families, according to a new report from the University of Bristol.
  • Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss associated with Alzheimer's 11 September 2019 Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia but the changes in brain cell function underlying memory loss remains poorly understood. Researchers at the University of Bristol have identified that calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss.
  • AI art: has science unravelled how we see and appreciate art? 11 September 2019 Art, it's in the eye of the beholder but has science found a way to identify what we really appreciate in paintings? The artistic tastes of individuals may have been finally unravelled thanks to University of Bristol researchers, artificial intelligence (AI) and eye-tracking technology.
  • An optimistic outlook 'means you live longer' 10 September 2019 Optimists are more likely to live longer than those who have a more negative approach to life, a US study has found.
  • Loneliness competition winners announced 6 September 2019 The Jean Golding Institute are pleased to announce that the winners of the latest data challenge competition are Nina Di Cara from Population Health Sciences and Tiff Massey, Analyst from Ernst and Young with their project ‘Is loneliness associated with movement for education?’. The specific research question assumes that in most cases, movement for primary and secondary education is associated with upward social mobility. That is, moving to try to get into a better school than is available in their current local area.
  • Generational study looks for biological links between adverse childhood experiences and self-harm 5 September 2019 New research from the University of Bristol is the first to use a large generational family study to examine links between childhood trauma, the impact of inflammation and self-harm.
  • Poor diet can lead to blindness 2 September 2019 An extreme case of "fussy" or "picky" eating caused a young patient’s blindness, according to a new case report published today [2 Sep 2019] in Annals of Internal Medicine. The University of Bristol researchers who examined the case recommend clinicians consider nutritional optic neuropathy in any patients with unexplained vision symptoms and poor diet, regardless of BMI, to avoid permanent vision loss.
  • Life-like robots soon to be reality 22 August 2019 Life-like robots that can make decisions, adapt to their environment and learn, are one step closer thanks to a University of Bristol team who has demonstrated a new way of embedding computation into soft robotic materials. This new advance, published in Science Robotics, could create new robotic possibilities to environmental monitoring, pollution clean-up, drug delivery, prosthetic devices, wearable biosensing and self-healing composites.
  • International collaborative projects win funding to tackle major health challenges 21 August 2019 Developing drugs to treat cancer and how sleep can support a healthy memory are two international collaborative projects led by academics at the University of Bristol that have been awarded major funding by the UK Research and Innovation's (UKRI) Fund for International Collaboration.
Pages: 1  |  2 > >>
Edit this page