Evolutionary perspectives on Language and Music from a hunter-gatherer point of view - Dr Jerome Lewis

25 November 2020, 1.00 PM - 25 November 2020, 3.00 PM

Dr Jerome Lewis, University College London

Online

Evolutionary perspectives on Language and Music from a hunter-gatherer point of view

Humanity evolved its characteristic communicative practices while living as African hunter-gatherers. The ethnography of contemporary egalitarian African hunter-gatherers offers important insights into the role early musicking behaviours may have served our distant ancestors.

Building on insights published in 2017, this talk elaborates specifically on the role of song in supporting the evolution of the human communicative spectrum, political organisation and the gendered nature of the human division of labour.

Knight and Lewis 2017 ‘Wild Voices’. Current Anthropology. 58(4):435-453.

Biography:

Jerome Lewis is an anthropologist specializing in Central Africa and hunter-gatherer societies since 1993. During long-term research and fieldwork in the Republic of Congo (Brazzaville) with BaYaka forest hunter-gatherers he studied egalitarian politics, language, ritual, music and dance. This has led to publications on egalitarianism, taboo, language, music and dance in cross-cultural and evolutionary perspective.

 

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