News in 2019

  • Scientists discover body’s protection shield 18 November 2019 Scientists have discovered a way to manipulate the body’s own immune response to help boost tissue repair. The findings, published in Current Biology today [18 Nov], reveal a new network of protective factors to shield cells against damage. This discovery, made by University of Bristol researchers, could significantly benefit patients undergoing surgery by speeding recovery times and lowering the risk of complication
  • Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics 25 September 2019 A new type of vaccine that can be stored at warmer temperatures, removing the need for refrigeration, has been developed for mosquito-borne virus Chikungunya in a major advance in vaccine technology. The findings, published in Science Advances today [Wednesday 25 September], reveal exceptionally promising results for the Chikungunya vaccine candidate, which has been engineered using a synthetic protein scaffold that could revolutionise the way vaccines are designed, produced and stored.
  • Putting the squeeze on red blood cells 11 September 2019 For the first time, researchers at the University of Bristol’s Blood and Transplant Research Unit, and the French National Institute for Blood Transfusion, have captured the moment a red blood cell is ‘squeezed’ while recording the changes that allow it to deform and subsequently recover its shape.
  • Scientists reveal how a faulty gene leads to kidney disease 15 August 2019 New insights into why a faulty gene involved in a devastating form of a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome leads to disease in some patients have been identified in new Kidney Research UK-funded research led by the University of Bristol. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), could pave the way for new ways to prevent or treat the condition, by revealing new targets to intervene in the process. Around 1 in 50,000 children are diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome each year.
  • Scientists hijack bacteria's homing ability 4 July 2019 In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. The findings, led by researchers at the University of Bristol and published in Chemical Science, could radically improve the treatment for cardiovascular disease, which causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK (1).
  • Blue colour tones in fossilised prehistoric feathers 26 June 2019 Examining fossilised pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue colour tones in prehistoric birds.
  • Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process 4 June 2019 Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells.
  • New research offers insight into the proteins in the brain that detect cannabis 30 April 2019 Researchers at the University of Bristol have made new progress in understanding how cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs), the proteins that detect the active components of marijuana, are controlled in the brain.
  • Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues 23 April 2019 Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. The new method, pioneered by Dr Adam Perriman and colleagues, involves re-engineering the membranes of stem cells to effectively “weld” the cells together.
  • Open afternoon 10th April 2019 10 April 2019
  • Further funding to advance health research at Bristol 29 January 2019 Elizabeth Blackwell Institute nurtures research to improve health for all. We're proud to share the recent funding successes of some of our awardees who have gone on to secure further for their research projects in three very different areas: fertility treatment, domestic violence support and Osteoporosis.
  • New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs 24 January 2019 Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a “master regulator” of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals.
  • Assessing the airborne survival of bacteria in aerosol droplets from coughs and sneezes 23 January 2019 The airborne transmission of diseases including the common cold, influenza and tuberculosis is something that affects everyone with an average sneeze or cough sending around 100,000 contagious germs into the air at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour.
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