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Unit information: Archaeological Practice in 2019/20

Please note: It is possible that the information shown for future academic years may change due to developments in the relevant academic field. Optional unit availability varies depending on both staffing and student choice.

Unit name Archaeological Practice
Unit code ARCH10016
Credit points 20
Level of study C/4
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 2 (weeks 13 - 24)
Unit director Dr. Prior
Open unit status Not open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department Department of Archaeology and Anthropology
Faculty Faculty of Arts

Description

This unit will introduce the methods and techniques that archaeologists commonly use to identify and record archaeological sites, features, structures and monuments.

The unit will provide a broad understanding of the range and nature of archaeological sites and monuments in the UK, and the ways in which archaeologists find, investigate, excavate and record them.

The main techniques of archaeological investigation and recording will be introduced including the use of maps, documents, digital resources and aerial photographs, earthwork survey, geophysical survey, excavation, levelling and standing building recording.

Aims:

- To introduce the range and nature of archaeological sites and monuments present in the UK. - To introduce the range of features that archaeologists frequently work on, such as buried remains, monuments, earthworks, standing buildings and landscapes. - To provide the basic field skills employed by archaeologists to investigate, excavate and record archaeological features, sites, monuments and landscapes.

Intended learning outcomes

Completion of this unit will enable students to successfully:

a. Identify the range and nature of archaeological sites and monuments present in the UK.

b. Identify the range of features that archaeologists frequently work on, such as buried remains, monuments, earthworks, standing buildings and landscapes.

c. Describe and employ the basic field skills currently used by archaeologists to investigate and record archaeological features, sites, monuments and landscapes.

d. Identify and explain the range and nature of British archaeological sites and monuments.

e. Practice key archaeological field techniques, and explain the results of fieldwork clearly.

f. Synthesise and assess various sources of evidence that relate to archaeological remains and/or monuments, including previous archaeological work, aerial photographs, documentary sources and historic maps.

g. Identify the appropriate technique to be used in the field.

h. Complete context sheets, section and planning drawing and basic matrices.

i. Describe and explain the chronological relationships between various archaeological deposits.

j. Keep a complete, organised and well-presented notebook.

Teaching details

  • Weekly two-hour lectures.
  • Weekly one-hour practical sessions (lab & field).
  • Participation in training excavation/lab sessions during term time

Assessment Details

Summative Assessment:

1) Notebook (50%) (Assesses ILOs: a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j)

2) Essay of 2000 words (50%) (Assesses ILOs: a, b, c, d, f, g)

Formative Assessment:

1) A series of practical tasks during the excavation for credit

Reading and References

Barker, P. 2003. Techniques of Archaeological Excavation. Routledge.

Bowden, M. (ed.) 1999. Unravelling the Landscape. Stroud: Tempus

Brophy, K. & Cowley, D. 2005. From the Air: Understanding Aerial Archaeology. Stroud: Tempus

Catling, C. 2009. Practical Archaeology. London: Lorenz Books

Collis, J. 2001. Digging up the Past: an intro to archaeological excavation. Stroud: Sutton.

Drewett, P. 2011. Field Archaeology: an introduction. Routledge.

Gater, J. & Gaffney, C. 2003. Revealing the Buried Past: geophysics for archaeologists. Stroud: Tempus

Greene, K. 2010. Archaeology: an introduction. London: Routledge.

Renfrew, C. & Bahn, P. 2012. Archaeology, Theories, Methods and Practice. London: Thames & Hudson

Roskams, S. 2010. Excavation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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