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Unit information: Social Policy and Development in 2018/19

Please note: It is possible that the information shown for future academic years may change due to developments in the relevant academic field. Optional unit availability varies depending on both staffing and student choice.

Unit name Social Policy and Development
Unit code SPOL20050
Credit points 20
Level of study I/5
Teaching block(s) Teaching Block 1 (weeks 1 - 12)
Unit director Dr. Gangoli
Open unit status Open
Pre-requisites

None

Co-requisites

None

School/department School for Policy Studies
Faculty Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

Description

The central aim of this unit is to analyse the relationship between social policies and the concept of development, and to demonstrate that comparative studies involve international systems. Starting with an analysis of theories of 'development', we will critique explanations propounded for uneven development between and within societies, and look at the role of gender, politics and power in debates around development. Policies pursued by "developing" countries and civil society action against globalisation and development inform future policy options and directions, and the unit will also explore and analyse social responses to policies on development. Comparisons here will include India and China.

The unit aims to:

  • Demonstrate that comparative studies involve international systems.
  • Familiarise students with development theories and debates on international funding.
  • Examine relationships between the ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ countries.
  • Study policies followed by ‘developing’ countries, and civil society responses to these policies, and to international systems including globalisation.

Students will be expected to be able to critique the theoretical positions on development, including an understanding of the importance of gender dynamics in the development paradigm and to understand the main arguments surrounding international definitions of poverty. Further, students should be familiar with the role of international agencies/organisations in the global economy and their effects in relation to the alleviation of poverty and distribution of resources. Comparisons between countries, on the issues of policies and civil society responses should ‘concretise’ understanding of the constraints and possibilities of different development paths followed.

Intended learning outcomes

Students will be expected to be able to critique the theoretical positions on development, including an understanding of the importance of gender dynamics in the development paradigm and to understand the main arguments surrounding international definitions of poverty.

Further, students should be familiar with the role of international agencies/organisations in the global economy and their effects in relation to the alleviation of poverty and distribution of resources. Comparisons between countries, on the issues of policies and civil society responses should ‘concretise’ understanding of the constraints and possibilities of different development paths followed.

Teaching details

Lectures and seminars.

Assessment Details

Assessment will be against the programme criteria defined for the appropriate level.

Formative assessment: One 2000-2500 word essay

Summative assessment : Level I - 3 000 word essay

Reading and References

  • Sen, A. and J. Dreze. (1995). India: Economic Development and Social Opportunity. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • Pickup, F, S Williams and C Sweetman (2001): Ending violence against women: a challenge for development and humanitarian work. Oxford: Oxfam.
  • Allen, T & Thomas, A (Eds) (2000) Poverty and Development into the 21st Century. Oxford University Press/Open University.

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