Exhibitions

The Theatre Collection currently has three exhibitions, which will run until autumn 2018:

 

All the world’s a stage: EMOTION AND THEATRE 

Emotion and Theatre is an exhibition curated by third year History of Art undergraduate students. It explores the display of emotion on stage as well as its manifestation behind the scenes and in other contexts; from the emotional reactions of an audience, to the raw emotion exercised in rehearsal and the performed emotion created by Live Art. The works have been selected from the holdings of the Theatre Collection and comprise a diverse range of media, including photography, etching, caricature, set and costume designs and Live Art documentation. This exhibition is on display in the Theatre Collection reading room and library.

 

In Character: Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh 1937-1973

Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh were among the biggest names in British theatre and film in the twentieth century. While their acting made the duo’s roles iconic, the costumes designed for them to wear on stage further consolidated their illustrious theatrical stature. The University of Bristol Theatre Collection holds a fascinating array of objects relating to Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh that reveal the relationship between actor, character and costume, as well as the close relationships they shared with costume designers such as Oliver Messel, Cecil Beaton, Doris Zinkeisen and Julia Trevelyan Oman. In Character is on display in the Theatre Collection lift lobby and has been curated by History of Art MA students.  

 

LOV200: celebrating the 200th anniversary of London Old Vic

Drawing on the London Old Vic Archive at the Theatre Collection, the exhibition will feature prints, photographs, playbills and ephemera to celebrate the history of the London Old Vic Theatre, founded originally as the Royal Cobourg Theatre in 1818. The exhibition will feature materials about the influential managers Emma Cons and Lilian Baylis as well as a fragment from the spectacular ‘glass curtain’ hung on stage in 1826!

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