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New article by Ludwig & Evens in JEP: Human Perception & Performance

3 March 2017

Decision making involves gathering information from different sources/locations. Casimir Ludwig and David Evens tested an "information foraging" account of how gaze is used to acquire noisy visual information in order to make perceptual decisions.

When we choose which cereal to buy in a supermarket it is likely that we visually compare different candidate options and shift gaze between different product. There is a great deal of interest in the relation between gaze behaviour and the underlying decision processes that lead to a choice. However, the actual strategy for allocating gaze to different sources of information (e.g. products) is not well understood. In this article, Ludwig and Evens developed and tested an "information foraging" account of how gaze is used to acquire noisy visual information in order to make perceptual decisions. By focusing on perceptual decisions, where it is well-defined what information should be extracted, they were able to characterise how information is acquired over time during a gaze fixation. In addition, they tested whether and how information was lost once a source of information was left behind in order to focus on a different source. Ludwig and Evens show that a switch from one source of information to another is driven by tracking a measure of the degree of (un)certainty about the information we are extracting from a source. Exactly what that measure is and how it is computed by the brain in real-time, are questions under investigation.

Further information

Full article available here: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/xhp/43/2/245.html 

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