Poverty Dimensions of the Impact of COVID-19 on BAME Communities

Poverty Dimensions of the Impact of COVID-19 on BAME Communities

On Thursday 30 July the Bristol Poverty Institute (BPI) held the second event in our new webinar series exploring the impacts of the COVID-19 on those experiencing, and/or at risk of falling into, poverty. This webinar focussed on how poverty can be both a cause and an effect of COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on Black Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities and individuals. Panellists explored various contributory factors including social, medical, and financial dimensions and different aspects of inequality, building on their respective knowledge and experience from different sectors.

The webinar consisted of a series of 15minute presentations from our fantastic panellists, with opportunity for a short Q&A following each presentation. You can find more information on the speakers as well as links to their presentations below.

Lauren Winch (Manager of Bristol Poverty Institute)

Introduction to Poverty Dimensions of the Impact of COVID-19 on BAME Communities

Presentation slides available for download here: Dr Lauren Winch, Manager, BPI (PDF, 150kB)

Video recording available to view below

 Dr Saffron Karlsen, University of Bristol

Understanding ethnic inequalities in COVID-19 

Dr Saffron Karlsen is a Senior Lecturer in the School for Sociology, Politics and International Studies at the University of Bristol. Her work aims to enable a better understanding of the different ways in which ethnicity has meaning and relevance in people's lives, both for developing awareness of potential group affiliations and as a driver of health and other inequalities. It engages particularly with the negative impact of forms of racist victimisation on these processes. Recently she has been working on a project documenting the specific impact on BAME populations during the pandemic and its associated lock-down in Bristol and the South West to identify specific needs and therefore inform context-driven interventions.

Presentation slides available for download here: Dr Saffron Karlsen, University of Bristol (PDF, 1,398kB)

Video recording available to view below

Dr Andrea Barry, Joseph Rowntree Foundation

The coronavirus storm: exposing pre-existing racial inequalities and poverty in the UK

Dr Andrea Barry is a Senior Analysist at Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF), leading analysis for JRF’s work outcome group. She plays a key role in providing and disseminating evidence and analytical work related to JRF’s outcomes. Specifically, she is involved in providing analysis and evidence for JRF to help more people find a route out poverty through work. Her research interests include the effects of globalisation on work and well-being in the UK, regional imbalances related to productivity and growth in the UK, relieving transport poverty, and understanding its effects on types of jobs available to those in poverty. 

Presentation slides available for download here: Dr. Andrea Barry, Senior Analyst, JRF (PDF, 1,398kB)

Video recording available to view below

Ms Chiara Lodi, Black South West Network

Economic impact of COVID-19 on black, Asian and minority ethnic businesses and communities

Ms Chiara Lodi is a Policy and Research Officer at Black South West Network (BSWN) and the lead author on their recent report on the Impact of COVID-19 on BAME Led Businesses, Organisations & Communities. Chiara has been at BSWN since 2018 where her work has focussed on identifying barriers hindering inclusive economic growth and collating evidence for the development of policy recommendations to reduce racial and socio-economic inequality. Recently she has expanded her contribution to other key community-based research projects in Bristol; namely Everyday Integration in Bristol and Bristol Digital Futures.

Presentation slides available for download here: Ms Chiara Lodi Policy & Research Black South West Network (PDF, 1,308kB)

Video recording available to view below

Dr Soumya Chattopadhyay, Overseas Development Institute

COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on the global poor: Pathways, patterns and concerns

Dr Soumya Chattopadhyay is a Senior Research Fellow in the Equity and Social Policy Programme, Overseas Development Institute (ODI), and was previously in the Poverty and Equity Global Practice at the World Bank. His expertise is in quantitative approaches to identifying groups that remain persistently marginalised from development processes. Areas of his current research include assessing policies, programmes and their impact on such groups through SDGs and other development initiatives. His presentation will focus on exploring the mechanisms which make those less privileged – such as ethnic and religious minorities, rural agrarian workers, those working in informal sectors, and those in poorer socio-economic communities – more vulnerable to the pandemic and its response systems, and how learning from this can potentially be applied to help reduce rather than exacerbate existing disparities.

Presentation slides available for download here: Dr Soumya Chattopadhyay, Overseas Development Institute (PDF, 605kB)

Video recording available to view below

Q&A: final session

Video recording available to view below

This webinar series aims to bring together a variety of participants representing different sectors, with a range of theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary approaches. We recognise that different professional, academic, and civic communities will have access to different sources of information, datasets, and tools for analysis, and may also have different immediate priorities. We are, however, all driven by the ultimate aim of reducing the negative impacts of this global pandemic on all aspects of society, and particularly on those communities and individuals who are already experiencing disadvantages. By bringing together a range of perspectives we seek to improve our understanding of the poverty dimensions of this pandemic, and by extension our ability to influence policy and practice in order to mitigate its negative impacts.

For more information or to discuss an idea please get in touch with BPI Manager Dr Lauren Winch (lauren.winch@bristol.ac.uk).

 

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