View all news

Why Bristol voters should care about European elections

23 April 2014

Only one in three of us are expected to bother voting in the European elections on Thursday, May 22. Yet the European Parliament has powers which have grown extensively over the years and affect many aspects of our daily lives.

Only one in three of us are expected to bother voting in the European elections on Thursday, May 22. Yet the European Parliament has powers which have grown extensively over the years and affect many aspects of our daily lives.

Dr Diego Acosta Arcarazo from Bristol University argues that we should all take the time and trouble to vote so we have a say in the democratic system which affects some 500 million people in 28 member states.

Environmental issues such as fracking are covered by European law as well as social ones such as extending maternity leave from 14 to 20 weeks.

Dr Acosta, a lecturer in European Law, said that when the European Community was first evolved, it was easy to understand its main principles of peace and prosperity throughout Europe.

But these principles were now mostly taken for granted and the EU now needs to forge a new "narrative" so its aims and objectives are understood on the world stage.

Dr Acosta said that an expected turnout of 32-38 per cent in the European elections should be seen in the context of low turnouts for local elections and the Bristol mayoral election, which was only 28 per cent.

You can read more at the Bristol Post or join the debate at the PolicyBristol event.

Edit this page