News in 2004

  • Household chemicals and asthma 23 December 2004 Frequent use of household cleaning products and other chemicals in the home could be linked to cases of asthma among Britain's children.
  • A brilliant family Christmas 22 December 2004 Jennifer and Peter Organ of Kings Stanley, near Stroud are making the final preparations for the Christmas they've dreamed of since they married 11 years ago. . . with baby Thea, the baby they thought they could never have.
  • Early Christmas present for CACS 22 December 2004 Over £600,000 has been awarded to Bristol University's Centre for Access and Communication Studies (CACS) to fund three national projects to help disabled people find work and enter higher education.
  • Bristol start-up helps Band Aid 20 21 December 2004 Technology developed by a company based at the University is helping this year's charity chart-topper raise money to combat famine.
  • The best of the best 21 December 2004 Four major awards were all granted in 2004 to researchers in Bristol University's Biochemistry Department: the best young biochemist in the country; the best young biophysicist in the country; the best young researcher working on diabetes in Europe; and a newly elected Fellow of the Royal Society.
  • University fundraising set for boost 20 December 2004 Professional fundraising operations could become the norm in UK universities following the Government's acceptance of advice from the task force on voluntary giving in higher education.
  • Detecting the limit: insect hearing at the nanoscale 20 December 2004 Professor Daniel Robert leads the Bionanoscience Group, in the School of Biological Sciences. There they use insects as model systems to help understand the fundamentals of hearing.
  • Repairing the nuclear industry 20 December 2004 Nuclear fission generates over 25 per cent of the electrical power in the UK. In France this proportion is greater than 70 per cent. Throughout the world there are 31 countries operating about 440 civil nuclear power systems to generate electricity.
  • The risks and benefits of taking antidepressants 20 December 2004 David Gunnell, Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Social Medicine, is advising Britain's Medicine and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency on a large study looking at the possible links between some types of antidepressant and suicide.
  • Westminster Diary 20 December 2004 Dr Nick Walker from the School of Chemistry was chosen to participate in the Royal Society's MP-Scientist pairing scheme. Nick was matched with the MP for Bristol West, Valerie Davey. As part of the scheme, he had to 'shadow' Valerie for four days and record the events.
  • Bumps, blips and bulges: why do things localise? 20 December 2004 Localised events do not always require localised causes argues Professor Alan Champneys, Head of the Engineering Mathematics Department.
  • Heavy metal plants 20 December 2004 Heavy metals occur naturally in small quantities in soil, but human activity has raised these to exceptionally high levels at many polluted land and water sites. A collaborative project between the Interface Analysis Centre and researchers at Rothamsted Research has found a novel solution to the problem.
  • ReproMED - researching the use of the internet in reproductive medicine 20 December 2004 About one in six couples seeks specialist help because of a difficulty in conceiving. Since 1995 ReproMED has pioneered use of the internet to support a range of initiatives in the field of reproductive medicine.
  • Crossing barriers – and hitting a brick wall 20 December 2004 An imaginative project found a cheap way to make sure patients receive the disability benefits to which they are entitled. So why don't policy makers implement it, asks John Kirwan, Professor of Rheumatic Diseases?
  • The exploration of Lake Ellsworth: an Antarctic subglacial lake 20 December 2004 In 1994 scientists met to discuss the exploration of lakes beneath the ice sheets on Antarctica. Ten years later a consortium of UK scientists met at Bristol University to plan the very first expedition. Professor Martin Siegert of the Bristol Glaciology Centre, School of Geographical Sciences, was there.
  • Does the lack of sleep make you fat? 20 December 2004 We are currently facing an obesity pandemic that is likely to have major medical, social and economic consequences. Of particular concern is the alarming increase in obesity in children. Dr Shahrad Taheri is exploring the novel idea that a lack of sleep may influence obesity.
  • Crocheted chaos 16 December 2004 The famous Lorenz equations that describe the nature of chaotic systems - such as the weather - have been turned into a beautiful real-life object, by crocheting computer-generated instructions.
  • Advances in heart research 15 December 2004 Heart experts from across Europe are meeting in Cambridge this week to discuss the development of a potential vaccine against heart disease and the role that stem cells could play in cardiac recovery.
  • The future's bright for diamond dust 14 December 2004 Expensive, bulky TV screens could be a thing of the past thanks to a collaboration between the University of Bristol and Advance Nanotech to develop new display technology made from diamond dust.
  • Youngsters to explore roman life 13 December 2004 A group of young people from Hartcliffe Engineering College, Bristol, will come to Bristol University to find out more about classics and ancient history.
  • Taking folate in pregnancy 10 December 2004 A paper to be published in the British Medical Journal this week suggests that there should be more research to determine if there is a long term association between high doses of folate or folic acid in pregnancy and an increased risk of breast cancer in later life.
  • Spin-out wins funding 9 December 2004 NeuroTargets Ltd., a discovery-led biotechnology company spun out from the University of Bristol, today announces that it has received seed financing from the SULIS Seedcorn fund, a £9 million seed fund set up as part of the government's university challenge fund initiative.
  • Sporting day out 8 December 2004 Up to 50 young people from Teyfant Community School, Hartcliffe, will join Bristol University students and staff for an all-action programme of sporting fun.
  • Does the lack of sleep make you fat? 7 December 2004 The recent rise in obesity may be partly due to the reduced amount of time we spend asleep, according to new research from the University of Bristol, UK.
  • Napoleon's fatal march on Moscow 2 December 2004 Napoleon''s fatal march on Moscow is set to be the theme of a free public lecture in Bristol by a distinguished historian and international bestselling author.
  • It's party time! 1 December 2004 Up to 120 local children will be having a fun and festive time at the tenth annual Kids' Christmas party organised by Bristol University's Student Community Action (SCA) on Saturday, December 4.
  • Spring mischief 1 December 2004 Bristol University's Department of Drama has just released its 2005 programme of short courses in Drama and Film under the banner of Spring Mischief.
  • Genetics of eczema 26 November 2004 A new study of atopic disease in families has come to the conclusion that fathers' genes play an equal part in the spread of eczema.
  • University launches new Violence Against Women Research Group 26 November 2004 On average two women are killed each week in the UK as a result of domestic violence. In response to this statistic the University of Bristol has launched a new Violence Against Women Research Group (VAWRG).
  • Worm takes first prize 25 November 2004 First prize in Bristol University's first writing competition Raising re:search has been won by Dr Simon Harvey from the School of Biological Sciences for his article on the evolution of the nematode worm entitled 'Lamarck's blacksmiths and the worm's genes'.
  • Sporting stars 25 November 2004 Mark Taylor, the University's Swimming Pool Manager and Aquatics Director, won the Coach of the Year Award at the prestigious Bristol Year of Sport Awards last night.
  • University to invest in technical skills 24 November 2004 Today [Wednesday, November 24] Bristol University will launch a new training programme to attract technical trainees in a variety of academic departments ranging from Clinical Veterinary Science to the Academic Renal Unit.
  • Exploring the road ahead 24 November 2004 A North Somerset group for young people with learning difficulties has made an innovative contribution to a research project undertaken by the University of Bristol.
  • University experts examine 'Ripper' watch 24 November 2004 A watch that may hold the key to the identity of Victorian serial killer Jack the Ripper, has been examined by experts at Bristol University's Interface Analysis Centre.
  • New University study to look at links between prostate cancer and diet 24 November 2004 The University of Bristol has been awarded funding of nearly £50k from leading cancer prevention charity World Cancer Research Fund, to embark on a study that will examine the links between prostate cancer and diet.
  • Oh sugar! Local author launches book 23 November 2004 Award-winning local author, Dr Sanjida O'Connell, will be speaking about her new book 'Sugar: the grass that changed the world', and signing copies, at the University of Bristol's Archaeology Department, 43 Woodland Road, at 6.30pm on 25 November 2004.
  • Our recent heritage - does it matter? 20 November 2004 The University of Bristol has collaborated with English Heritage on 'Change and Creation', a programme of debate, consultation and public engagement that attempts to better understand the nature and value of the later 20th century landscape.
  • Bristol professor in Top 10 Innovators list 18 November 2004 Bristol University's Professor Joe McGeehan, the man credited with pioneering many of the major developments in mobile communications, has been placed sixth in a list of global technology trend-setters.
  • Bristol students launched into the world of business 18 November 2004 An exciting new initiative has been launched at the University of Bristol to invest in and develop bright ideas for new businesses proposed by students. BUBA, Bristol University Business Angels, is a student run company with up to £30,000 worth of financial support from the University of Bristol.
  • University lands £1.2 million grant for pioneering addiction 16 November 2004 A £1.2 million grant has been made by the Medical Research Council (MRC) to Bristol University allowing the Psychopharmacology Unit to carry on with its ground-breaking research work.
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