Staff Details

Michael Naughton


Michael Naughton

Dr Michael Naughton is a Reader in Sociology and Law with joint appointments in the School of Law and the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS). He obtained his BSc (Hons) (First Class) and PhD from the University of Bristol, UK. In 2003, he was an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology, University of Bristol. He was appointed as a Lecturer at Bristol in 2004, progressed to Senior Lecturer in 2007, and was promoted to a Readership in 2012.

Michael teaches in the general area of crime, justice and society and in his specialist area of miscarriages of justice and has written widely on issues related to miscarriages of justice and the wrongful conviction of the innocent for leading academic journals, professional magazines and broadsheet newspapers.

He is the author of Rethinking Miscarriages of Justice: Beyond the Tip of the Iceberg (2007, paperback 2012), Claims of Innocence: An Introduction to Wrongful Convictions and How they Might be Challenged (2011) (with Gabe Tan), and he is the editor of Criminal Cases Review Commission: Hope for the Innocent? (2009 [paperback 2012]).

He is the Founder and Director of the Innocence Network UK (INUK), an umbrella organisation for member innocence projects in UK universities, which he established in the University of Bristol Law School in September 2004. Through the vehicle of INUK, he has actively assisted in setting up 34 innocence projects in UK universities to date (August 2012) and provides conferences and training materials to support and progress the work of INUK's member innocence projects. He is Founder and Director of the University of Bristol Innocence Project, the first innocence project in the UK, through which he directs pro bono investigations into cases of alleged wrongful convictions.

Michael welcomes proposals for doctoral supervision within the general area of crime and justice and especially research associated with any aspect of miscarriages of justice and the wrongful conviction and imprisonment of the innocent.

Teaching