News in 2018

  • Bristol researchers win EPSRC fellowship to develop AI for early disease diagnosis in calves 22 June 2018 Two researchers at the University of Bristol have been awarded a joint Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) Fellowship to investigate early disease diagnosis in dairy calves using artificial intelligence (AI) methods.
  • Bristol researchers to benchmark medicine use across UK beef farms 14 June 2018 Researchers at the University of Bristol are to quantify and compare farm animal medicine use within and across UK beef operations. The project aims to help demonstrate and communicate the gains made to consumers, processors, retailers and policy makers.
  • Bristol Immunisation Group looks back at 2017-18 14 June 2018 Professor Adam Finn, Dr Julie Yates and Dr Marion Roderick, Directors of the Bristol Immunisation Group Health Integration Team (BIG HIT), give an update on the HIT's progress in 2017-18.
  • UK public shows strong preference for vaccines that prevent severe illness, particularly for children 13 June 2018 The UK public has a clear preference for funding vaccination programmes which protect young children against severe diseases, finds a new study that considered the public’s preferences on vaccines available on the NHS. The study suggests that the public’s preferences about which vaccines are made available on the NHS, particularly children, are not reflected by the current approach. The Meningitis Research Foundation (MRF)-funded study, led by University of Bristol researchers, is published today [13 June] in PLOS ONE.
  • Predicting the outcome of the arms race between man and bacteria 7 June 2018 Through computer simulations, scientists can predict if bacteria can be stopped with popular antibacterial therapies or not – a breakthrough which will help select and develop effective treatments for bacterial infections.
  • Managing infectious disease in primary care: using real-time syndromic and microbiological surveillance 1 June 2018 Researchers from the University's Centre for Academic Primary Care and NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Evaluation of Interventions have found promising evidence that local real-time surveillance of infectious disease, such as flu, could help GPs make better diagnostic and treatment decisions, reducing the amount of unnecessary antibiotic prescribing.
  • How Nagana is carried by tsetse flies 18 May 2018 Researchers at the University of Bristol have revealed new details on how the animal disease Nagana is spread by tsetse flies in Africa.
  • Pig immunology comes of age: killer T cell responses to influenza 17 May 2018 Researchers from The Pirbright Institute, University of Bristol, Cardiff University and University of Oxford have generated tools that allow scientists to understand a vital area of the pig immune system which was previously inaccessible.
  • £1M to study how health-related data collected by people living with HIV can be used to improve clinical outcomes 10 May 2018 Recent media reports about the use and exploitation of personal data have increased public awareness of the benefits and drawbacks of the digital age. £11 million has been awarded to 11 projects by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to further the understanding of Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS) issues in the Digital Economy.
  • Can a home WiFi router act as a medical sensing device? 10 May 2018 New research that could transform the future of healthcare will investigate whether it is possible to reuse WiFi radio waves as a medical radar system. The research, led by the University of Bristol, is part of a new £1.5 million grant awarded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Toshiba and Decawave to the OPERA project, a consortium including the universities of Bristol and Oxford; University College London and Coventry University.
  • New research shows that one of the most widely used treatments for childhood eczema is not helpful 7 May 2018 The BATHE trial has found that pouring emollient additives into the bath do not add any benefit over standard management. Standard management of childhood eczema includes soap avoidance, leave-on emollients and corticosteroid ointments.
  • PhD student awarded the prestigious Herbert Tabor Young Investigator Award 4 May 2018 Dr Catherine Back has been awarded the prestigious Herbert Tabor Young Investigator Award for her publication describing the structure and the ‘catch-clamp’ binding mechanism of the protein “CshA” involved in life-threatening infections of the heart.
  • MRC awards Bristol researcher £1.2M to investigate immune defence against microbes 30 April 2018 University of Bristol researcher, Dr Borko Amulic, has been awarded a prestigious Career Development Award worth £1.2 million by the Medical Research Council (MRC) to lead research into how the natural ability of neutrophil immune cells can be boosted to fight infection in the post-antibiotic age.
  • Bristol Vet School at the forefront of combatting antimicrobial resistance 28 April 2018 Researchers from the Bristol Veterinary School at the University of Bristol are leading the way with farmers to combat and change antimicrobial (AM) use on farms. Antimicrobial resistance - or AMR - is a global threat, with an estimated 700,000 people dying from resistant infections every year.
  • New DNA screening pinpoints whose blood the vampire bat is drinking 25 April 2018 A new method of screening vampire bat DNA could help tackle rabies thanks to a joint Danish and British study.
  • Collaborative research to improve health and care 18 April 2018 Scientists are collaborating with NHS and public health staff to ensure that research evidence is used effectively to improve public health and patient outcomes. Professor Jenny Donovan, NIHR CLAHRC West Director, and Lara Edwards, NIHR CLAHRC West Manager, explain why collaboration is so important and offer some examples of the benefits it brings.
  • What is the best way to treat infected hip replacements? 5 April 2018 New research has found treating an infected hip replacement in a single stage procedure may be as effective or better than the widely used two-stage procedure. To date no well-designed study has compared these procedures head-to-head to decide if one is better or if they achieve the same results. Hip replacement is a very common operation that is effective at providing pain relief and improving mobility, however, infection can sometimes occur following joint replacement. The findings have wide implications for orthopaedic surgery, the NHS, and health systems worldwide.
  • UH Bristol part of ground-breaking study of over 5,000 children and young people with childhood arthritis 5 April 2018 Researchers from University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, led by Professor A. V. Ramanan, will join Medical Research Council-funded scientists from across the UK to begin a five year study of childhood arthritis and its linked eye inflammation, called uveitis.
  • Surgeries employing GPs with additional training in complementary medicine appear less likely to prescribe antibiotics 20 March 2018 Use of complementary/alternative medicine may help reduce over-prescribing of antibiotics
  • Forecast launched to help sheep farmers respond to annual spring threat to young lambs 7 March 2018 It may not feel like it in parts of the UK hit by 'The Beast from the East' and Storm Emma, but spring is just around the corner – and with it the annual deadly threat from the roundworm Nematodirus in lambs.
  • Watch fat cells help heal a wound in a fly 27 February 2018 Fat body cells in Drosophila play a surprising role in sealing wounds and preventing infection, researchers at the University of Bristol report in the journal Developmental Cell.
  • Tackling antimicrobial resistance worldwide 14 February 2018 Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a serious and growing global health challenge. It occurs when microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi and viruses) emerge that cannot be killed by normal doses of an antimicrobial drug (such as antibiotics and antivirals), making them less susceptible or resistant to antimicrobial agents. AMR can jeopardise the success of surgery and chemotherapy, and could have grave implications for the future of modern medicine. As such, it is an urgent global threat which requires a coordinated cross-government, academic and industry response. A GW4 research community has brought together leading AMR expertise across four universities to help tackle this issue.
  • New targets revealed for the treatment of inflammatory conditions 14 February 2018 Research by the University of Bristol has shed light on the way our clotting cells and immune cells control their interactions with each other.
  • Lung cancer drug resistance explained by computer simulations 12 February 2018 Scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Parma, Italy, have used molecular simulations to understand resistance to osimertinib - an anticancer drug used to treat types of lung cancer.
  • Antibiotic resistance in children’s E. coli is high when commonly prescribed antibiotics are used 2 February 2018 Antibiotic resistance in children’s E. coli, a bacteria that is the most common cause of urinary tract infection, is high against many antibiotics commonly prescribed in primary care and could make them ineffective as first-line treatments, warns a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol and Imperial College London.
  • Health Economics at Bristol updates 11 January 2018 The Health Economics at Bristol (HEB) team works closely with local and national policymakers and carries out methodological and applied research. Our three key research themes are the economics of health and care across the life course, efficiency and equity in decision-making, and methods for applied health economics.
  • Bristol appoints Professor Tavaré to lead new Faculty of Life Sciences 9 January 2018 Professor Jeremy Tavaré will take up the role of Dean when the University of Bristol’s new Faculty of Life Sciences is officially launched on 1 August this year.
  • £10 million hub to tackle global vaccination challenges 3 January 2018 The University of Bristol will contribute to a new research hub to increase global immunisation coverage and improve response to viral outbreaks through the rapid and cost-effective deployment of vaccines.
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