News in 2016

  • Diabetes UK Scholarship 25 January 2017 Dr Kathleen Gillespie, Alistair Williams and Anna Long have received £95,308 for a Diabetes UK Scholarship which will allow Claire Williams to investigate the mechanisms underlying natural regulation of the autoimmune response to Zinc Transporter 8.
  • Professor Alastair Hay appointed to NICE committee for managing infections 24 January 2017 Alastair Hay, Professor of Primary Care at the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC), has been appointed to the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Management of Common Infections committee.
  • Diabetes Research and Wellness Foundation Fellowship award success 18 January 2017 Dr Jody Ye, a postdoctoral researcher in the Diabetes and Metabolism Unit in the School of Clinical Sciences, was awarded the Diabetes Research and Wellness Foundation Non-Clinical Fellowship.
  • Stewardship policy reduces antimicrobial use on farms 12 January 2017 Evidence suggests the frequent use of certain antimicrobials (AM) in food-producing animals may reduce their effectiveness as treatments for both animals and humans. Researchers at the University of Bristol’s School of Veterinary Sciences are finding novel ways to address these concerns, working with farmers to empower them to develop policies to promote more responsible use of medicines on farms. The new stewardship policy – facilitated by the AMR Force research group - is already informing industry and legislative bodies, allowing them to deliver real, on-farm changes while maintaining or improving herd health and welfare.
  • New research describes how bacteria resists ‘last-resort’ antibiotic 10 January 2017 An international research team, led by the University of Bristol, has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin – a ‘last resort’ antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options. Last year, members of the team, led by Dr Jim Spencer from the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues from Oxford, Cardiff, Diamond Light Source, Thailand and China, identified mcr-1 as the first colistin-resistance gene that could be passed between bacteria, enabling resistance to spread rapidly within a bacterial population.
  • Diabetes and Metabolism Group recognition 9 January 2017 Bristol's Diabetes and Metabolism Group, led by Dr Kathleen Gillespie, has been described as an exceptional training environment for postgraduate students.
  • NIHR award for Prof Julian Hamilton-Sheild 6 January 2017 Professor Julian Hamilton-Shield has lift off for an i4i NIHR study to undertake a study on "Evaluation and validation of a breath ammonia measurement technology for the improved management of patients with urea cycle defects".
  • The Society of Endocrinology Early Career Grant 3 January 2017 An Early Career Grant was awarded to Dr Felicity Stubbs to research "The role of glucocorticoids on P53 dependent cell-cycle control)".
  • Bristol researcher wins Bayer Global Ophthalmology Award 14 December 2016 Dr Sofia Theodoropoulou, Clinical Lecturer in Ophthalmology at Bristol, has received a Global Ophthalmology Award 2016 from Bayer. The award recognises ophthalmologists’ outstanding commitment and ambition to develop their skills and improve the lives of patients living with ophthalmic diseases.
  • Small droplets feel the vibe 22 November 2016 A team of researchers at the University of Bristol have used ultrasonic forces to accurately pattern thousands of microscopic water-based droplets. Each droplet can be designed to perform a biochemical experiment, which could pave the way for highly efficient lab-on-a-chip devices with future applications in drug discovery and clinical diagnostics.
  • British Council Award for Dr Andrew Davidson 10 November 2016 Dr Andrew Davidson from the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine has received funding from the British Council.
  • Studies offer new insights for treating stomach infections 8 November 2016 Researchers have discovered a new approach to preventing or treating a stomach bacterium associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer as well as gastritis and duodenal ulcers. Writing in the journal ‘Nature Microbiology’, a team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Duisburg-Essen at Essen University Medical Centre and the University of Bristol detail how they discovered a completely new approach to infections related to the Helicobacter pylori bacterium.
  • Smart stem cells home to damaged tissue 28 October 2016 Stem cell-based therapy promises cures for a multitude of diseases and disorders including regeneration of heart tissue, but is severely limited by the ability of stem cells to identify the damaged location and remain there after administration. A new strategy is being developed at the University of Bristol to address this challenge.
  • Antibiotics could be cut by up to a third, say dairy farmers 26 October 2016 Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Those questioned also think that over the next five years they could cut their own antibiotic use by almost a third in dry cow therapy and a fifth in clinical mastitis. The survey of over 300 farmers, farm managers and farm workers conducted by RADBF last month in collaboration with the University of Bristol assessed attitudes to and use of antibiotics in dairy and beef farming. It was carried out in the wake of the Government-commissioned O'Neill Review on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) published earlier this year.
  • Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Force 25 October 2016 Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) research at the School of Veterinary Sciences is promoted and facilitated by the AMR Force, who work both in the South West, nationally and internationally, and are interested in decreasing antibiotic use while improving animal health through a plurality of approaches addressing differing styles and attitudes.
  • Students launch new research journal 25 October 2016 Students from the medical and dental schools of Bristol, Cardiff, Exeter and Plymouth have joined forces to launch a new journal that showcases original research undertaken in world-class laboratories and clinics by fellow students. The ‘INSPIRE Student Health Sciences Research Journal’ is produced by a team of student editors from the four universities. It is a key part of a collaborative project under the national INSPIRE scheme funded by the Wellcome Trust and administered by the Academy of Medical Sciences.
  • Kidney Research UK Award 24 October 2016 Prof Richard Coward in the School of Clinical Sciences has been awarded a Kidney Research UK Clinical Training Fellowship.
  • A pilot study of oral immunotherapy 18 October 2016 Dr Doug Wilson, Senior Lecturer in the School of Veterinary Sciences, has been awarded £225,486 from The Horse Trust.
  • 15 million Euros for Bristol Renal 13 October 2016 Bristol Renal have been successful at being part of a 15-million Euro European grant to study diabetic nephropathy.
  • Fund UK-China Antimicrobial Initiative Funding Success for Helen Lambert and Colleagues 6 October 2016 Many congratulations to Dr Helen Lambert (Social and community Medicine and the ESRC AMR Champion) and colleagues who have been awarded £882,688 (UK)/£1,828.878 (combined with NSFC funding from China) to undertake a project on "pathways to optimising antibiotic use in Anhui province: Identifying key determinants of antibiotic consumption and prescribing in community and clinical settings".
  • NIHR Doctoral Research Fellowship to Dr Anna Bibby 28 September 2016 The grant for the TILT trial is an NIHR Doctoral Research Fellowship awarded to Dr Anna Bibby to undertake a feasibility study of intra-pleural immunotherapy using the streptococcal preparation OK-432 in patients with mesothelioma.
  • Multiple Sclerosis Society award 27 September 2016 Reducing the uncertainty around MS progression is one of our top research priorities. We know that progression and increasing symptom severity is linked to the damage and loss of nerve fibres in the brain and spinal cord, but currently these are difficult to measure. This project will measure the levels of KIF proteins in the fluid surrounding the spinal cord and brain of people with MS.
  • Research in Bristol boosted by £21 million award over five years 26 September 2016 University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UH Bristol) in partnership with the University of Bristol has been awarded more than £20 million over five years by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to fund cutting-edge research.
  • Results of the Big Tick Project 26 September 2016 Almost one third of dogs (31 percent) checked at random during a visit to a vet were found to be carrying a tick.
  • Confidence in Concept Award for Colin Chu 22 September 2016 Colin Chu in the School of Clinical Sciences was funded for "Viral Gene Therapy for Glaucoma using CRISPR-Cas9".
  • Confidence in Concept Award for Marcus Drake 21 September 2016 Marcus Drake in the School of Clinical Sciences was awarded funds to pursue "Urinary catheter redesign to reduce complications and improve tolerability".
  • TRACK Award for Paddy Horner in Social and Community Medicine 16 September 2016 Paddy Horner from the School of Social & Community Medicine was awarded funding for "Detection of seminal bacterial sialidase activity in men provides a new therapeutic opportunity for infertile couples".
  • TRACK Award for Michelle Barbour in Oral and Dental Sciences 15 September 2016 Translational Acceleration and Knowledge Transfer (TRACK) awards are available through the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute for Health Services and they support health-related translational projects.
  • New algorithm could help GPs reduce antibiotic use in children with coughs and RTIs 14 September 2016 Researchers have developed a technique that will help GPs identify which children with coughs and respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are most at risk of future hospitalisation.
  • Ariel Blocker Catalyst Award Success 5 September 2016 The Elizabeth Blackwell Institute awarded Ariel Blocker in the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine funds from their Catalyst scheme for the pursuit of a project on "Rational vaccine design: can one identify protective antigens systematically in silico? A pilot study focusing on epitope design for Shigella and Salmonella vaccines".
  • Vicky Hunt Awarded an Early Career Fellowship 30 August 2016 Vicky Hunt in the School of Biological Sciences has been awarded an Elizabeth Blackwell Institute Early Career Fellowship in order to pursue her project "The roles of MIRNAS is parasitic nematode infection".
  • Prisoners and HIV Infection Rates 23 August 2016 A UoB team contributed to a study looking specifically at the 15 UNAIDS designated countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) that gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.
  • New Mechanism for Protein Secretion 17 August 2016 Proteins made inside the cell often need to be exported in order to do their job. A team comprised of researchers at UoB and Leeds looked at the transport motor that sits within the membrane, known as 'Sec' (for secretory).
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections Pitch 15 August 2016 Emer Brangan gave a three minute ‘elevator pitch‘ presentation at the Society for Academic Primary Care (SAPC) conference on the CLAHRC West project looking at telephone-based management of sexually transmitted infections in primary care.
  • Immune Cells Remember First Meal 12 August 2016 Whilst an inflammatory response is beneficial for human health, many human diseases (including atheroscelerosis, cancer and arthritis) are caused or aggravated by an overzealous immune response. A greater understanding of what activates the immune response will help design novel therapies to treat these inflammatory disorders.
  • Support and Treatment After Replacement 9 August 2016 Many knee replacement operations take place because of the pain caused by osteoarthritis. Around 20% of people will suffer moderate or severe long-term pain after their operation. Thus roughly 15,000 people in the UK every year will have long-term pain after surgery.
  • Journal of Immunology Highlight 9 August 2016 An article published in the 15 June 2016 issue of The Journal of Immunology is being featured by the In This Issue section. The section highlights articles considered to be among the top 10% of articles published in the journal.
  • Amber Study 25 July 2016 Prof Tony Killard, Head of Biomedical Sciences at(UWE), has created a mass producible sensor which can detect ammonia levels in breath - named AmBeR.
  • 100th Oxford Ophthalmological Congress 15 July 2016 The 100th Oxford Ophthalmological Congress was held 3 - 6 July 2016 in Oxford.
  • Meeting Demand in Bacterial Factories 12 July 2016 Work conducted by BrisSynBio describes a new way to model productivity in bacteria used as minifactories to produce biological components. With no extra resources supplied, these bacterial ‘factories’ have to decide between making a new protein or making proteins for their own survival.
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