About the symposium

Resolving the world’s most pressing development challenges requires a radically more ‘joined up’ approach to delivering research. The Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) has provided a catalyst for UK institutions to collaborate across disciplines, sectors and continents in pursuit of real development outcomes.

Following a year of awards under GCRF, the University of Bristol is delighted to host an international symposium to share best practice, develop new connections, and generate new research partnerships that help to tackle global development challenges.

Join us for a packed three-day Symposium, focussed on the broad themes of:

  • Food security
  • Energy in a developing context
  • Global health
  • Poverty
  • Insecurity and conflict
  • Migration
  • Natural hazards

Sessions will be in a variety of formats – from plenary talks to ‘challenge-led workshops’, and from high-profile panel debates to data challenges – ensuring you have the opportunity to engage in new ideas and make a wide variety of new contacts.

What will you get out of it?

You will hear directly from both funders & those working in-country on global challenges, build new partnerships, share your work, and consider how it could be applied in new areas.

We are strongly committed to ensuring the symposium is a catalyst for new connections with overseas partners and as such, funding is available to support international participation from ODA recipient countries.

Funding available

To find out more about the travel bursaries available to support international participation, please email us at: gcsymposium-2018@bristol.ac.uk

An opportunity to apply for pilot project funds will also be available to all those who attend, ensuring that new connections and ideas can be supported following the conference.

Global challenge research

From improving global health to helping people prepare for natural hazards, our research collaborations are focused on solving real-world problems.

Discover more about our global challenge research.

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