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Evgenia Partasi to exchange ideas and expertise on cultural diversity in primary education

Evgenia Partasi, final year doctoral student at the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol

Evgenia Partasi, final year doctoral student at the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol

21 June 2010

Evgenia Partasi, has been awarded a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and expertise on cultural diversity in primary education with leading academics at the College of Education (CoE), University of Washington, through a six week visit beginning Autumn 2010, thanks to a Research Mobility Programme Award funded by the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN).

Evgenia Partasi

Evgenia Partasi, final year doctoral student at the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol

Evgenia Partasi, has been awarded a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and expertise on cultural diversity in primary education with leading academics at the College of Education (CoE), University of Washington, through a six week visit beginning Autumn 2010, thanks to a Research Mobility Programme Award funded by the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN).

Under the supervision of Tom Stritikus at the CoE, University of Washington, Evgenia intends to engage staff there in the exciting data she has collected for her forthcoming PhD thesis exploring ‘the ways in which cultural diversity is shaping the experiences of students and teachers in Greek Cypriot primary schools and how multiculturalism affects students’ identities’.

She hopes to obtain valuable feedback from her US peers to enrich her reccommendations for curriculum and policy development in Cyprus, as well as conduct interviews with US Multicultural Education experts to broaden her research base. The visit also promises space for investigating other possible colllaborations between the Universities of Bristol and Washington such as joint publications, research projects, and further reciprocal visits.

At the University of Bristol, Evgenia is supervised by Dr Sheila Trahar who is one of the few people in the UK who continues to engage with ways in which narrative inquiry and autoethnography can enable students and academics in higher education to reflect critically on their experiences of and beliefs about learning and teaching, and how those practices are culturally mediated.

Find out more about Doctoral study at the Graduate School of Education

Visit Dr Sheila Trahar’s staff page

Find out more about the University’s Identities theme