University campus locations

Arts complex

A series of very large internally modernised Victorian buildings housing seminar rooms and lecture theatres.

Life Sciences

Opened in 2014, our Life Sciences building is the University of Bristol's biggest construction project to date. It hosts state-of-the-art teaching labs, a range of formal and informal learning spaces and a spacious atrium. On the roof of the building is a GroDome capable of recreating tropical conditions, and the exterior of the building hosts a striking vertical garden, known as a living wall, which stands over 20 metres above street level.

Chemistry

Built in the 1960s, the Chemistry Building has a good sized foyer which offers natural light. The foyer walls are in a ceramic deco style. The usual range of lecture theatres, laboratories and meeting rooms.

The Hawthorns

Formerly a thriving hotel, The Hawthorns brought together five Georgian houses. Now housing the University’s Conference Office and Student Study Areas with quiet spaces and computer areas together with the Refectory for good value meals.

Merchant Venturers Building‌

A modern building with a sweeping clear roof above the foyer, known as The Atrium, the Merchant Venturers Building has plenty of natural light. As you’d expect, you’ll find lecture theatres and meeting rooms. The Atrium is a popular exhibition site‌.

HH Wills Physics Building

Designed by Sir George Oatley, this building opened in 1927 as a purpose-built facility to provide seminar rooms and lecture theatres. On the roof is a 6 metre radio telescope, the Coldrick Observatory (see image), used to monitor the birth of stars in the Milky Way.‌

Queen's Building

Home to the Department of Engineering, this building was completed in 1958, having been designed in the 1930s as building plans were put on hold due to the war. Shows strong art deco influences in its design. As the name indicates, this building was opened by HRH Queen Elizabeth II.

Royal Fort House

With its fine Rococo plasterwork, carved woodwork and spacious reception rooms, Royal Fort House has charming original features wherever you look. It was built for wealthy merchant Thomas Tyndall in 1756 on the site of the Royal Fort, which was ruined in the English Civil War. The building projects Baroque, Palladian and Rococo styles on three different facades, a compromise after three different architects were engaged (see picture).‌

Social Sciences Complex

Very large Victorian houses that have been internally modernised to create lecture theatres and seminar rooms.

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Life sciences building - modern, futuristic office and lab locations.
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Chemistry complex - 1960s exteriors and interiors
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Coldrick observatory - a 6 metre radio telescope offering potential for science fiction location filming.
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HH Wills Physics Building
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